HCC

Harford Community College

2016 - 2017 Credit Catalog

HCC

Course Descriptions

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CATALOG INDEX

Accounting
Allied Health Sciences
American Sign Language
Anthropology
Art + Design
Arts Management
Assessment for Prior Learning
Astronomy
Biology
Business Administration
Chemistry
Communication Studies
Computer Aided Design & Draft
Computer Information Systems
Computer Science
Criminal Justice
Drama
Earth Science
Economics
Education
Electronics
Engineering
Engineering Technology
English
Environmental Sciences
Finance
Forensic Science
French
General Science
Geography
German
Health
History
Information Systems Security
Interdisciplinary Studies
Mass Communications
Mathematics
Medical Assisting
Music
Nursing
Office Systems
Orientation
Paralegal
Philosophy
Photography
Physical Education
Physical Science
Physics
Political Science
Practical Nursing
Psychology
Religion
Sociology
Spanish
Student Activities
Student Development
Theatre
Visual and Performing Arts

ACCT - Accounting
This course is an introduction to accounting theory and practice with an emphasis on accounting for assets. The complete accounting cycle is presented and end-of-period financial reports are prepared.
This course focuses on accounting for the corporate form of organization. Emphasis is placed on the corporate capital structure, investments, liabilities, the cash flow statement, budgeting and managerial accounting for costs. Prerequisite: ACCT 101.
This course introduces the student to the personnel and payroll records that provide the information required by the numerous laws affecting the operation of a payroll system. The student prepares state and federal tax forms and documents and appropriate internal records to support those documents. Prerequisite: ACCT 101.
This course introduces the student to the elements of financial reporting and the techniques used to analyze and interpret financial statements. Prerequisite: ACCT 101.
This course introduces spreadsheets as an accounting tool. Students learn to design and prepare electronic spreadsheets used in solving accounting problems and making managerial decisions. Prerequisites: CIS 102 or BA 210 or permission of instructor and ACCT 101.
This course is an introduction to the concepts and uses of computerized accounting information systems. The student learns to apply accounting principles in recording business transactions and generating accounting reports and financial statements using general ledger accounting software. Prerequisites: ACCT 101.
This course provides the student with an exposure to federal taxation and laws governing gross income, deductions, credits, and other areas relating to individual taxpayers, as well as familiarity with tax forms and concepts. Prerequisite: ACCT 101 or permission of instructor.
This course provides an exposure to the federal tax laws governing partnerships, corporations, and employers and Maryland state tax laws and forms. Time permitting, additional areas and types of taxation will be discussed. Prerequisite: ACCT 203 (ACCT 102 is strongly suggested).
(3 Credits)
This course is an introduction to auditing theory and standards. The student will learn the complete audit process including: risk assessment, internal control systems, audit evidence, working papers, quality control, statistical sampling, implications of computer-based systems to the audit process, and the preparation of audit reports. Prerequisite: ACCT 102.
This course is the study of cost accounting with emphasis on cost accumulation, the flow of costs through the accounts, cost allocation and control in job order, process, and activity-based cost systems. Prerequisite: ACCT 102 and one unit of high school algebra or MATH 023 or MATH 024 or equivalent.
This course emphasizes planning and control, stressing the cost-benefit philosophy. Managerial accounting deals with providing information to internal decision-makers through (1) routine reporting to management, primarily for planning and control, and (2) special reporting to management, primarily for long-range planning and nonrecurring decisions. Prerequisite: ACCT 101. Students are expected to perform basic algebraic calculations in this course.
This course prepares students for the Certified Bookkeepers Certification exam. The student learns and applies accounting theory and practices to all major areas covered by the Certified Bookkeepers exam, including: adjusting entries, error correction, payroll, depreciation, inventory, and internal control and fraud prevention. Prerequisite: ACCT 101; Corequisite: ACCT 104.
This course provides an in-depth application of the generally accepted accounting principles to cash, short-term investments, receivables, inventories, current liabilities, long-term liabilities, plant assets, and intangible assets, along with a review of basic accounting theory and statement preparation. Prerequisite: ACCT 102.
This course provides an in-depth application of the generally accepted accounting principles to investments, stockholders' equity, revenue recognition, accounting for income taxes, pension costs, leases, accounting changes and error analysis, the calculation and presentation of earnings per share, and the statement of cash flows. Prerequisite: ACCT 211.
This course provides accounting fraud examination education to accounting and non-accounting students. Basic accounting and auditing theory as it relates to fraud schemes as well as internal control to deter fraud is presented. This course examines fraud as it relates to financial statements and financial reporting. Emphasis is also given to elements of fraud investigation including interviews, gathering evidence, tracking transactions, evaluating deception, and reporting results. Prerequisite: ACCT 102.
Cooperative Education experiences are work-based learning experiences with an employer for a specific period of time. The experience may be paid and must be related to the career and specific curriculum in which the student is enrolled. It is an opportunity for the student to supplement/integrate classroom learning with learning from a related work setting. A student registers for one to four credits of Cooperative Education in the curriculum in which he/she is enrolled. Prerequisite: approval of program coordinator.
Cooperative Education experiences are work-based learning experiences with an employer for a specific period of time. The experience may be paid and must be related to the career and specific curriculum in which the student is enrolled. It is an opportunity for the student to supplement/integrate classroom learning with learning from a related work setting. A student registers for one to four credits of Cooperative Education in the curriculum in which he/she is enrolled. Prerequisite: approval of program coordinator.
Cooperative Education experiences are work-based learning experiences with an employer for a specific period of time. The experience may be paid and must be related to the career and specific curriculum in which the student is enrolled. It is an opportunity for the student to supplement/integrate classroom learning with learning from a related work setting. A student registers for one to four credits of Cooperative Education in the curriculum in which he/she is enrolled. Prerequisite: approval of program coordinator.
Cooperative Education experiences are work-based learning experiences with an employer for a specific period of time. The experience may be paid and must be related to the career and specific curriculum in which the student is enrolled. It is an opportunity for the student to supplement/integrate classroom learning with learning from a related work setting. A student registers for one to four credits of Cooperative Education in the curriculum in which he/she is enrolled. Prerequisite: approval of program coordinator.
AHS - Allied Health Sciences
The student will develop a working knowledge of medical terminology, spelling and word-building, and develop an understanding of some of the more common legal and ethical situations that the allied health professional may encounter. Course includes 45 hours of lecture per semester.
This course is designed for students in the Electroneurodiagnostic (END) Program and requires students to spend 12 hours per week in a clinical setting. The student will learn the basics of taking a patient history and infection control and will be introduced to the terminology and skills needed to become familiar with the equipment that may be used by an END technician. Course includes 180 hours in a clinical setting per semester. Prerequisites: AHS 101, ELEC 105, BIO 203, CPR for health care providers; permission of instructor required. Course fee.
This course involves an individual assignment of 21 hours/week in a cooperating hospital histology laboratory to provide the student with the opportunity to learn the histological procedures used in a clinical laboratory. Particular emphasis is placed on the preparation and sectioning of tissues for staining. Course includes 315 hours in a clinical setting per semester. Prerequisites: BIO 203, 204, 205, and AHS 101. Permission of instructor required.
This course involves an individual assignment of 21 hours/week in a cooperating hospital laboratory to provide the student with the opportunity to refine those skills acquired in AHS 150 in a clinical setting. Particular emphasis is placed on staining procedures and tissue identification. Course includes 315 hours in a clinical setting per semester. Prerequisite: AHS 150. Permission of instructor required. Usually offered in spring semester.
This course is designed for students in the END program. The student spends 33 hours per week in a clinical setting and learns the fundamental techniques necessary to accurately obtain an EEG on a patient. The student also learns how to document the working conditions of the EEG equipment and identify a normal EEG. Course includes 495 hours in a clinical setting per semester. Prerequisite: AHS 149; permission of instructor required. Course fee.
This course is designed for students in the EEG program. The student spends 33 hours per week in a clinical setting refining and expanding on the fundamental skills learned in AHS 152. Course includes 495 hours in a clinical setting per semester. Prerequisite: Completion of AHS 152 with a minimum grade of C and permission of instructor. Usually offered in spring semester.
This course involves an individualized advanced clinical experience in a cooperating hospital laboratory to provide the opportunity to complete the requirements for the practical portion of the Histology Technician Registry Examination. Emphasis is on advanced techniques in tissue processing, routine staining and special staining. Prerequisites: AHS 150 and 151. Permission of instructor required. Offered in first five weeks of summer session.
A series of lectures and discussions on current and emerging procedures in the field of histotechnology. Each class meeting will be devoted to a new procedure. Possible topics: 1) Special Stains, 2) Immunohisto-chemistry, 3) Electron Microscopy. Prerequisite: one laboratory course in biology or chemistry and permission of instructor.
A series of lectures and discussions on current and emerging procedures in the field of histotechnology. Each class meeting will be devoted to a new procedure. Possible topics: 1) Special Stains, 2) Immunohisto-chemistry, 3) Electron Microscopy. Prerequisite: one laboratory course in biology or chemistry and permission of instructor.
A series of lectures and discussions on current and emerging procedures in the field of histotechnology. Each class meeting will be devoted to a new procedure. Possible topics: 1) Special Stains, 2) Immunohisto-chemistry, 3) Electron Microscopy. Prerequisite: one laboratory course in biology or chemistry and permission of instructor.
ASL - American Sign Language
Students learn American Sign Language basic syntax and vocabulary, enabling them to communicate effectively with members of the deaf community. This course is designed for hearing persons.
Building on the skills developed in American Sign Language I, students expand their sign vocabulary and knowledge of syntax. Students also become familiar with the subculture of the deaf community. This course is designed for hearing persons. Prerequisite: ASL 101 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Students continue to refine and develop their sign vocabulary and knowledge of syntax at an advanced level. Students also experience the subculture of the deaf community. This course is designed for hearing persons. Prerequisite: ASL 102 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
ANTH - Anthropology
This course is an introduction to the origins and development of humans, emphasizing physical evolution and cultural development. Consideration is given to the principles and concepts of physical anthropology and interpretation of archeological discoveries.
The focus of this course is an objective examination of the wide variations of human cultures using the scientific method. Cross-cultural analysis of kinship, stratification, association, age/sex groups and cultural change is stressed.
Course description not available at this time.
In this course, bits of stone, pottery, bricks, and nails are used to piece together Maryland's past. This course involves students in the discovery of Maryland's "history in the ground" through a combination of classroom instruction, independent research, and participation in an archaeological excavation in Harford County, such as at the on-campus historic Hays-Heighe House site. Students develop analytical skills, knowledge of Maryland life from early prehistory through the 19th century, and an appreciation of historical and archaeological research.
ART - Art + Design
This course is an introduction to conceptual and formal issues in contemporary art and design and color theory through the hands-on creation of two-dimensional studio projects using a wide variety of media and processes. Course work includes readings, lecture, studio work, and critique. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester. Course Fee.
This course is an introduction to graphic design concepts and the application of design principles in the creation of visual communication, primarily for print media. Concepts include fundamentals of type use, creation of graphics, graphic and type integration, layout design, preparation of art for reproduction, and fundamentals of the printing process. This course is taught in the Macintosh Digital Arts Lab using current software. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab per semester. Prerequisite: ART 120 or permission of instructor. Course fee.
(3 Credits)
This course provides an opportunity to expand existing knowledge of basic fundamentals involved in art. By exploring various media, students are encouraged to develop flexible attitudes and skills with drawing, painting and collage projects. The exercises are directed at stimulating creativity and encouraging personal vision, integrating traditional media, found objects, photographs and new possibilities. This course focuses on historical, international and contemporary references. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester. Course fee.
Fundamentals of 3-D Design is an introductory course in the study of the formal elements of art --- line, plane, mass, volume, texture, color, and composition --- as they relate to form in space. Various materials and processes are used throughout the course. Course work includes lecture, studio work and critique for both art majors and non-majors. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester. Course fee.
This course is an introduction to digital media and its culture. Through hands-on assignments, lectures, and readings, students learn the language of new media and its many applications within the fine arts. Topics include media theory, history of the computer, digital imaging, interdisciplinary arts, net art and the use of computer technologies in the creation of fine art. This course is taught in the Macintosh Digital Arts Lab using current software. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab per semester. Course fee.
(3 Credits)
This course is an introduction to sculptural concepts, techniques and processes. Emphasis is on the development of an understanding of sculpture through the use of various media and methods including clay modeling, plaster casting and fabrication with wood and other materials. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester. Course fee.
(3 Credits)
This course is an introduction to basic drawing media including pencil, charcoal, pen and ink, and traditional techniques of rendering through the study of the human figure, landscape, still life and architectural forms. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester. Course fee.
(3 Credits)
This course is an introduction to basic painting concepts and media using oil and/or acrylic, techniques in preparing canvas or other support, and color theory, particularly as it pertains to color mixing. Working primarily from observation in subjects such as, but not limited to, still-life, landscape, and the figure (may be clothed or unclothed), students also briefly explore non-objective painting and work from the imagination. Integration of form and content is emphasized. Completion of or co-enrollment in ART 111 is recommended, but not required. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester. Course Fee.
(3 Credits)
This course provides an opportunity to learn the fundamentals of working with clay. Emphasis is on hand building techniques used in creating ceramic forms. The course includes an introduction to glaze formulation and application and various firing processes. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester. Course fee.
This course establishes the foundation for all other computer-based classes within the Art & Design program. Students are introduced to the computer as an art-making tool. Through a series of lectures, demonstrations and studio work, students learn basic computer navigation/practices, scanning, printing, and a variety of select software packages used for image creation/manipulation, graphics and page layout. This course is taught in the Macintosh Digital Arts Lab using current software. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab per semester. Course fee.
Intended for those with little to no drawing experience, this course focuses on observational drawing and right brain/left brain modes of seeing. Students draw using traditional black and white media, learn to analyze drawings by a diverse group of artists, and use drawing as a tool for creative thinking. Students may draw from a nude model. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester. Course Fee.
Through a series of lectures, demonstrations, visual/technical projects and critiques, students learn the theory and application of the physical and psychological effects of color. Students will develop problem-solving, critical thinking, art historical knowledge, and craftsmanship through art and design projects. Students will also investigate how color is used to influence the emotional and intellectual responses of the viewer and research how culture profoundly influences those reactions. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester.
This course introduces the concepts, theory, and fundamental practices of working with time-based media as an expressive and communicative art form. Students creatively explore sequencing, transformation, and motion through time and space, using images, video, sound, and text. This course is taught in the Macintosh Digital Arts Lab using current software. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab per semester. Course fee.
Course description not available at this time.
Course description not available at this time.
Course description not available at this time.
This course is a study of prehistoric, ancient and medieval art from a cultural perspective. The recognition of major art works and styles is emphasized. The development of art concepts and techniques is considered. This course may require field trips.
This course is a study of art from the Early Renaissance to the twenty-first century from a cultural perspective. The recognition of major art works and styles is emphasized. The development of art concepts and techniques is considered. This course may require field trips.
This course is a study of art and architecture in America from the Colonial era to today. Contributions of Americans to world art, the role of art in American life, and the work of outstanding artists and architects are stressed. The recognition of major art works and styles is emphasized. The development of art concepts and techniques is considered. This course may require field trips.
(3 Credits)
This course is a study of the genesis and evolution of alphabets, typeface and typographic design. This course analyzes the graphic designer's working relationship with the commercial printing industry. Emphasis on graphic techniques, desktop publishing, and videographic imaging, as well as course practice in handlettering, sign-writing, transfer type, and copy-fitting. This course is taught in the Macintosh Digital Arts Lab using current software. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab per semester. Course fee.
(3 Credits)
This course continues the development of visual communication skills begun in ART 103. Emphasis is on creative problem solving and the creation, execution and presentation of graphic design primarily for print media. This course is taught in the Macintosh Digital Arts Lab using current software. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab per semester. Prerequisite: ART 103 or permission of instructor. Course fee.
This course refines the students' understanding of the computer and digital imaging software as art-making tools. Through a series of lectures, demonstrations, visual/conceptual problem-solving projects and critiques, students expand their technical and aesthetic skills in the creation and manipulation of digital images, design and text. Emphasis is placed on visual content development strategies for both print and digital media. This course is taught in the Macintosh Digital Arts Lab using current software. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab per semester. Prerequisite: ART 120 or permission of instructor. Course fee.
(3 Credits)
A study of the human figure (may be clothed or unclothed) and other observable forms, this course emphasizes the development of skills in the description of volume, spatial interval and the formal organization of the image. Through practice and critique, the student will extend his or her range of concept and expression in drawing. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester. Prerequisite: ART 111. Course fee.
(3 Credits)
A concentrated study of the human figure and other observable forms, this course emphasizes the spatial, compositional and expressive functions of color and form. Through practice and critique, the student will extend his or her range of concept and expression in painting. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester. Prerequisite: ART 113. Course fee.
(3 Credits)
This course is an introductory study of a variety of printmaking processes including relief printing, intaglio, collagraph and monoprinting. Emphasis is on the development of technical facility in printmaking methods and on an understanding of the aesthetic differences between various types of printed images. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester. Course fee.
(3 Credits)
This course is a continued development of sculptural concepts, techniques and processes. Emphasis is on further technical development in modeling, casting and fabrication, using a variety of methods and materials, as well as on the continued exploration of sculpture as an art form. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester. Prerequisite: ART 109. Course fee.
(3 Credits)
A continuation of the development begun in Ceramics I, this course emphasizes wheel thrown forms and an increased study of glaze formulation and firing processes. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester. Prerequisite: ART 115. Course fee.
(3 Credits)
This course emphasizes the development of personal expressive means through independent research and technical experimentation. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester. Prerequisite: ART 213. Course fee.
(3 Credits)
Advanced individualized study of the student's specialized interests in terms of subject, style and medium in drawing, this course emphasizes developing professional work and methods of exhibiting and marketing. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester. Prerequisite: ART 221. Course fee.
(3 Credits)
Emphasis is placed on creative initiative, technical experimentation and independent research. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester. Prerequisite: ART 214. Course fee.
(3 Credits)
An advanced, individualized study of the student's particular interests, this course emphasizes developing professional work and methods of exhibiting and marketing. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester. Prerequisite: ART 223. Course fee.
(3 Credits)
This course provides specialization in the student's particular area of interest with emphasis on a more detailed study of glaze formulation and firing cycles. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester. Prerequisite: ART 220. Course fee.
(3 Credits)
This course is an advanced individualized study in the student's particular area of interest. Emphasis is on developing a body of work for exhibit. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester. Prerequisite: ART 225. Course fee.
(3 Credits)
A continuation of the development of sculptural ideas, techniques and methods, this course emphasizes choosing and combining materials in order to best suit the development of individual sculptural ideas. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester. Prerequisite: ART 219. Course fee.
(3 Credits)
This course is an advanced individualized study in the student's specialized area of interest in terms of subject, style and medium in sculpture. Emphasis is on developing a body of work for exhibit. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester. Prerequisite: ART 227. Course fee.
This course expands the students' knowledge, skills, and aesthetics in the use of digital media. Through a series of lectures, demonstrations, visual/conceptual problem-solving projects, and critiques, students learn the principles and techniques involved in planning, designing, and creating Web sites using visual HTML editing software. Emphasis is placed on design principles and aesthetics as they apply to Web page development. This course is taught in the Macintosh Digital Arts Lab using current software. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab per semester. Course fee.
This course expands the students' knowledge, skills and aesthetics in the use of digital media. Through a series of lectures, demonstrations, visual/conceptual problem-solving projects and critiques, students learn the principles and techniques for creating 2-D computer animations. Topics include vector-graphic animation, bit-mapped animation, and the use of montage, collage, motion and transformations as forms of expression. This course is taught in the Macintosh Digital Arts Lab using current software. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab per semester. Prerequisites: ART 101 and ART 120 or permission of instructor. Course fee.
This course expands the students' knowledge, skills and aesthetics in the use of digital media. Through a series of lectures, demonstrations, visual/conceptual problem-solving projects and critiques, students learn the principles and techniques for creating 3-D computer models and animations. Topics include 3-D modeling, rendering, compositing, animation, and an investigation of perception and illusion as it pertains to 3-D on the computer. This course is taught in the Macintosh Digital Arts Lab using current software. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab per semester. Prerequisites: ART 107 and ART 120 or permission of instructor. Course fee.
This course investigates the professional practice of preparing and creating art portfolios. Students will learn to apply their aesthetic and technical skills to the development of an art portfolio for transfer, the job market, college art school program admissions, or for gallery exhibition and/or grant opportunities. Topics include resume development and an examination of the methods for employment, networking, and opportunities in the arts. This course is taught in the Macintosh Digital Arts Lab using current software. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab per semester. Prerequisite(s): ART 120 or permission of instructor. Course fee.
This course is an on-site study of the art and architecture of the ancient world, with focus on Greece and Rome, c. 1300 BCE - 476 CE. Travel in Greece and Italy provides students firsthand experience with the art, architecture, culture, physical remnants and historical legacies of these civilizations. Students examine the art and architecture of these civilizations and the cultural, social and political history that shaped their development and laid the foundation for the creation of the modern western world. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and meets HCC travel requirements. Course fee.
This course is a study of the art and culture of Asia from the Neolithic period to the early modern era. The focus is on the traditions of India, China, and Japan. Topics may include the connections between the arts and religion, nationalism, and major philosophical traditions. Usually offered fall semester. This course may require field trips.
This course is a study of the art, architecture, and cultural forms from the middle of the 19th century to the present day. The focus is on the art and culture that defined the modern age. Topics discussed may include industrialization and consumerism, nature and science, "modernism" and the avant-garde, and the impact of wars and revolutions. Usually offered spring semester. This course may require field trips.
Ceramics Workshop is designed for the experienced ceramic artist to create a forum for the exchange of aesthetic, philosophical and technical ideas and theories. Along with creating personal work, students contribute to the development of a professional studio ambiance and structure with responsibilities for kiln firing, glaze formulation, exhibits, shows and sales. Students must purchase clay and tools.
Art and Design Field Project is an individual assignment in a selected local commercial art studio which provides the student with experience in practical applications of previously studied processes and techniques. Prerequisites: ART 204, ART 207 and ENG 209.
Art and Design Field Project is an individual assignment in a selected local commercial art studio which provides the student with experience in practical applications of previously studied processes and techniques. Prerequisites: ART 204, ART 207 and ENG 209.
Art and Design Field Project is an individual assignment in a selected local commercial art studio which provides the student with experience in practical applications of previously studied processes and techniques. Prerequisites: ART 204, ART 207 and ENG 209.
Art and Design Field Project is an individual assignment in a selected local commercial art studio which provides the student with experience in practical applications of previously studied processes and techniques. Prerequisites: ART 204, ART 207 and ENG 209.
APL - Assessment for Prior Learning
Students learn how to identify, analyze, and document prior experiential learning for academic credit in a portfolio format. Essential portfolio components include a chronological record of life experiences since high school, a life experience analysis of college level learning and documented evidence that this learning has occurred. Students also identify and equate their knowledge of courses taught at Harford Community College. Prerequisite: ENG 101 and permission of the instructor. Course fee.
In this seminar, students work one-on-one with the instructor to develop a comprehensive portfolio. Students develop appropriate goal statements, chronological tables, autobiographies, and delineation of college-level learning for each course to be assessed for credit. Prerequisite: APL 101.
ASTR - Astronomy
A course in the fundamentals of descriptive astronomy is especially appropriate for nonscience majors. Students study the solar system, stars, nebulae, galaxies, and universe and their relation to the earth.
An introductory laboratory course in the fundamental measurement techniques of astronomy, this course is especially appropriate for nonscience majors. Instruction focuses on selected portions of the solar system, nebulae and galaxies. Prerequisite: ASTR 151; ASTR 151 may also be taken concurrently. Course fee.
BIO - Biology
This preparatory course is designed for students who plan to enroll in BIO 203, Anatomy and Physiology I. The course examines fundamental principles in general, organic, nuclear and biochemistry, cell biology and genetics. The development of academic skills required for the study of the sciences is emphasized throughout the course. May not be used to meet the graduation requirements. Prerequisites: High school chemistry or CHEM 010. A qualifying score on the Biology for Allied Health Assessment Test also meets the prerequisite requirements of BIO 203, Anatomy and Physiology. The course meets for a total of 30 lecture hours and 30 laboratory hours per semester. Course Fee.
In this introductory course for nonscience majors, a general survey of the characteristics of life is presented, including such topics as cellular biology, metabolism, organ systems, genetics, development, evolution, behavior and ecology. A brief examination of both the plant and animal kingdoms is presented. NOTE: BIO 100 will not satisfy the science requirement for science majors. The course meets for a total of 90 contact hours per semester.Course fee.
(4 Credits)
This introduction to the animal kingdom includes a survey of the taxonomy, morphology, anatomy and physiology of animals using selected organisms. Primary laboratory emphasis is concerned with physiological processes, survey of phyla and field studies. The course meets for a total of 30 lecture hours and 60 laboratory hours per semester. Prerequisite: BIO 120 or permission of instructor. Course fee.
Designed for nonscience majors, this course includes a survey of the structure and function of human body systems and the disorders in those systems which result from disease processes.
This is an introductory genetics course for nonscience majors emphasizing the fundamental genetic concepts and how they affect humans. Topics such as genetic engineering, genetic diseases and gene repair are discussed. Prerequisite: high school biology.
This course investigates the fundamentals of plant science. Included topics are plant anatomy and physiology, classification, genetics, ecology, and the importance of plants to society. Students conduct laboratory investigations, observe local plant communities, examine the relationships between plants and animals and evaluate the relationships between soil and plant health. The course meets for a total of 45 lecture and 45 laboratory hours per semester. Course fee. Field trips may be required.
This laboratory course provides hands-on learning using dissection, physiology exercises, models and slides, science technology, computer activities, and experimentation to reinforce the concepts in BIO 108, Human Body in Health and Disease. The course meets for a total of 30 laboratory hours per semester. Co-requisite: BIO 108. Course fee.
This course is intended for students who plan to enroll in BIO 203, Anatomy and Physiology I. This course is not for biology majors. This course examines fundamental principles in general, organic, nuclear and biochemistry, cell biology, metabolism, development, molecular biology, epigenetics, biotechnology, and inheritance. The application of these topics in the health science field is stressed. The development of academic and reasoning skills required for the study of the sciences are emphasized throughout the course. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: a grade of C or higher in high school chemistry or CHEM 010 and qualifying score on the reading assessment or ENG 003 or ENG 018. Course fee.
An introduction to biology (cellular/molecular) for the science major. Basic biological principles common to plants and animals, cell structure and function, biochemical processes, heredity, cell reproduction, and gene expression are presented. Laboratory emphasizes open-ended experimental methods of inquiry. The course meets for 45 lecture/discussion hours and 45 laboratory hours per semester. Prerequisite: high school chemistry or CHEM 010. Course fee.
An introduction to biology (organismic/evolutionary) for the science major. This course emphasizes basic biological principles of evolution, ecology, and behavior. Laboratory emphasizes open-ended experimental methods of inquiry and field studies. The course meets for 45 lecture/discussion hours and 45 laboratory hours per semester. Prerequisite: high school chemistry or CHEM 010 and BIO 120 or BIO 100. Course fee.
This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts of biotechnology. Included are overviews of the history and development of biotechnology, applications of DNA and protein technology in the biomanufacturing and biopharmaceutical industries, bioinformatics, and bioethics. Prerequisites: BIO 120 and qualifying score on math placement or MATH 026; Prerequisite or co-requisite: CHEM 111.
This course allows students to gain practical knowledge of commonly used biotechnology laboratory techniques, including specialized laboratory instruments, preparation of common solutions and reagents, and methodology. The student learns techniques used in laboratory maintenance, equipment calibration, and laboratory safety. This laboratory-based course is designed to accompany Foundations of Biotechnology (BIO 124). The course meets for 45 laboratory hours per semester. Corequisite or prerequisite: BIO 124. Course fee.
This course is designed to introduce students to the current methods used in the study and application of nucleic acids and proteins. Topics include an overview of the techniques used to manipulate DNA and RNA in industry and research, protein purification, and production of a biotechnology product. The applications of this technology in agriculture and medicine will be addressed. Laboratory techniques parallel lecture and expand on the topics addressed. Prerequisites: BIO 124 and BIO 125. The course meets for 45 hours of lecture and 45 hours of laboratory per semester. Course fee.
Discoveries in biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies are being used to manufacture new products to improve health and the treatment of diseases. This course covers the development, manufacturing and testing of biomedical products, including the regulatory protocols which companies must follow. The course includes a survey of proteins and other products currently in production by biotechnology companies. Prerequisite: BIO 124.
Course description not available at this time.
Course description not available at this time.
(3 Credits)
This course introduces the science major to the diversity, structure and function of organisms and the processes that generate diversity, emphasizing phylogeny and the evolution of major groups of organisms. Prerequisites: BIO 120 and BIO 121.
This course provides a comprehensive study of the structure and function of the human body. This course focuses on the histology, gross anatomy and physiology of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous and endocrine systems. Additional topics include special senses and human tissues. Emphasis is placed on the anatomy of the organ systems and the maintenance of homeostasis for optimal functioning of the human organism. This course includes a total of 45 hours of lecture and 45 hours of laboratory. Prerequisite: BIO 099 or BIO 119 or BIO 120 with permission or qualifying score on Biology for Allied Health Assessment Test. Course fee.
This course provides a comprehensive study of the structure and function of the human body. The course focuses on the histology, gross anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. It also provides students with an understanding of the crucial functions of energetics, thermoregulations, fluid, electrolyte and acid-base balance. Emphasis is placed on the physiology of the organ systems and the maintenance of homeostasis for optimal functioning of the human organism. The course includes a total of 45 hours of lecture and 45 hours of laboratory time. Prerequisite: grade of C or better in BIO 103 or BIO 203. Course fee.
This course is for those students requiring a college level microbiology course. The general characteristics of microorganisms are presented, emphasizing host-parasite relationships, details of morphology and physiology, methods of control and problems of virulence. Consideration is given to the nonpathogenic forms. The laboratory parallels the discussion and provides experience in microbial technique. The course includes a total of 45 hours of lecture and 45 hours of laboratory.Prerequisite: BIO 119, or BIO 120, or BIO 103/203, or permission of instructor. Course fee.
(4 Credits)
This course presents the principles of inheritance in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms and the application of these principles to contemporary issues. Major topics include Mendelian inheritance, gene mapping, molecular genetics, regulation of gene expression, population genetics, and the applications of genetics in biotechnology. Upon completion, students demonstrate a broad understanding of genetics and the principles of heredity. Course meets for 45 hours of lecture and 45 hours of laboratory per semester. Usually offered in the fall semester. Prerequisites: BIO 119 or BIO 120; qualifying score on the math assessment or MATH 026.
(3 Credits)
This course is a basic nutrition course for biology or nursing students or those in related health fields. The functions of the nutrients, their utilization throughout the various stages of life, and the effects of nutrient excesses and deficiencies are studied. Current nutritional topics are discussed, including food fallacies, weight control, and cultural, social and psychological influences on food habits. Prerequisites: BIO 100, BIO 108, BIO 119, BIO 120, or BIO 203.
Course description not available at this time.
Cooperative Education experiences are work-based learning experiences with an employer for a specific period of time. The experience may be paid and must be related to the career and specific curriculum in which the student is enrolled. It is an opportunity for the student to supplement/integrate classroom learning with learning from a related work setting. A student registers for one to four credits of Cooperative Education in the curriculum in which he/she is enrolled. Prerequisite: approval of program coordinator.
Cooperative Education experiences are work-based learning experiences with an employer for a specific period of time. The experience may be paid and must be related to the career and specific curriculum in which the student is enrolled. It is an opportunity for the student to supplement/integrate classroom learning with learning from a related work setting. A student registers for one to four credits of Cooperative Education in the curriculum in which he/she is enrolled. Prerequisite: approval of program coordinator.
Course description not available at this time.
BA - Business Administration
This course introduces students to the American private enterprise system and the forms of businesses that operate within it. Students study the role of business in American society, international business activity, the impact of ethics and social responsibility on business, entrepreneurship and small business, and emerging trends in technology, organization, and management. Topics covered include economics, management, marketing, accounting, and financial management.
(3 Credits)
Students explore the basic concepts of public relations and its relationship to mass communication media and advertising. Students have the opportunity to acquire the basic skills necessary to conduct public relations projects.
Students study the importance of advertising and sales promotion to both consumers and industry. The choice of media and creative strategy as it relates to the consumer and product/service is discussed. Also included is the role of research in the development of the advertising message. Students examine how to judge what and how well an ad communicates to consumers.
Students study the principles upon which successful selling is based. Topics covered: sales in our economy, opportunities in selling, analysis of buyer motives and product selection, the sales process and ethics in selling.
This course takes a middle management approach, with emphasis in six major areas: (1) the retail environment and the consumer; (2) human resource management; (3) retail institutions; (4) researching the location; (5) merchandising mix; and (6) retail promotion.
This course offers insight into effective management for first-time supervisors or those who will hold supervisory positions. The course identifies the needs and realities of the supervisor's working world and deals with such responsibilities as work planning, interviewing, selecting, training, motivating, developing and appraising employees. Emphasis is placed on providing specific guidance for tasks generally assigned to supervisors.
This course includes a survey of personnel procedures, employee management relations, collective bargaining, grievance procedures, wage and salary administration, manpower development, human relations and organizational development.
This introductory management course enables students to identify and describe the major functions of management which include planning, organizing, leading and controlling. Students participate in individual and group activities providing practice in exercising these functions. Attention also focuses on the ideas, thoughts and theories of major contributors to the field of management such as Drucker, Maslow, Herzberg, McGregor and McClelland. Prerequisite: BA 101 or permission of instructor.
This course introduces students to the process of creating, identifying, evaluating and financing an entrepreneurial venture. Students gain insight into the characteristics, attitudes, habits, and behaviors of successful entrepreneurs. Students learn to craft an idea, good or service into a marketable product.
This course looks at the role of purchasing in industry and government with topics including organization, personnel selections, pricing, negotiation and quality assurance. The student learns the process of inventory management, value engineering, make-or-buy, traffic management and purchasing of capital equipment. Ethical decision making, policy and procedures in the purchasing industry, legal aspects, and computer-based inventory systems are an integral part of this course.
This course is designed to enable teams of students to successfully complete the facets of technology transfer. Students will be able to proceed through the phases of technology transfer to include identifying, assessing, marketing, and determining licensing opportunities of innovations. Students will examine technology overviews prepared by participating research labs and select one invention to take through the technology transfer cycle.
This course provides a basic introduction to careers in the field of casino management. The course provides students with detailed information about the gaming industry and the socio-economic impact of gaming in the United States. The course includes material that will develop student awareness of problem gambling, its impact, treatment and the gaming industry's responsible gaming programs.
This course enables students to identify regulations, practices, and policies in the field of human resources, with particular emphasis on federal human resources management. Students examine Equal Employment Opportunity laws, position management principles, position descriptions, employee benefits, labor/management relations, the Fair Labor Standards Act, and performance management.
This course enables students to learn a systematic approach to improving individual and organizational performance. Students study position management in succession planning to support a high-performing organization. Special emphasis is placed upon the importance of employee training and development in the federal government.
This introductory course enables students to acquire a foundation in strategic human capital management concepts, principles, and best practices, with particular emphasis on federal human capital management. Students develop skills and use metrics to align human resources goals, budgets, and outcomes with departmental missions.
This course introduces students to the role of supply chain management in the global economic system. Students examine the role of supply chain components, logistics concepts, warehousing practices and distribution management. Prerequisites: BA 101 and MATH 026.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to explore leadership through multiple modes of inquiry and learning experiences. Students identify and develop leadership skills and philosophies through study, observation, and application. Students are encouraged to make real-world connections and apply their leadership theory to their own leadership experience and leadership goals. This course integrates readings, experiential exercises, films, and contemporary readings on leadership. Three lecture hours per week.
This course introduces students to principles of effective farm and agribusiness management. Students examine the evolution of agriculture and agribusiness, learn application of business management tools, and analyze agribusiness management problems through case studies. Study includes the specific challenges facing farm and agribusiness managers, such as changes in weather conditions or government policies.
This course introduces students to the importance of inventory management in the global supply value chain. Students examine the role of managing inventories, forecasting demand levels, computing break even points, cycle counting, material requirements planning, warehousing practices and distribution management. Prerequisites: BA 130
Students are introduced to fundamental marketing concepts and techniques related to product, pricing, distribution and promotional strategy. Students explore trends in the marketplace and identify opportunities for creating value for customers through marketing strategy.
(3 Credits)
This course focuses on a study of the Uniform Commercial Code as it applies to negotiable instruments and secured transactions. The course emphasizes agency, business organizations, and employment law. It examines creditors' rights, bankruptcy, property law (real and personal), and estates.
This course is designed for those who want to go into business for themselves and for those already in business for themselves who wish to strengthen their entrepreneurial and management skills. In this course, students receive an overview of entrepreneurship followed by a comprehensive study of the steps of managing a new small business venture. Course includes 45 lecture hours per semester.
This course is designed to give students interested in becoming a buyer or merchandise manager the background and knowledge necessary to profitably buy merchandise. Emphasis is on the techniques and internal planning that take place within a retail organization in order to present merchandise to the customer. The course is given from the buyer's point of view with the accent on exercises that reflect real-life situations. Prerequisite: BA 106 or permission of instructor.
This course analyzes the agricultural marketing system from several perspectives. Students learn about the marketing process, food markets, international markets, pricing, food quality grading standards, and regulations in the food industry. The course addresses issues impacting commodity marketing in areas such as livestock, dairy, poultry, grain, cotton, textile, tobacco, fruits, and vegetables. Prerequisite: BA 101 or permission of instructor.
This course introduces the student to the uses of the PC for analysis, critical thinking, problem solving, electronic data management and for the reporting/presentation of results. Business, accounting, and financial problems and application are emphasized. Students develop competence with word processor, data base, spreadsheet, charting, graphics and communication tools in a visually-oriented computing environment. Integration of the tools or packages is emphasized. Course fee.
This course provides the novice, as well as the experienced microcomputer user, with a working knowledge of the World Wide Web to do research and tap an abundance of resources available on the Internet. Course fee.
This course addresses the basic nature of successful project management. Emphasis is placed on project planning, Work Breakdown Structures, time and resource management, and cost estimation in industries such as public administration, business, engineering, manufacturing, health care, construction, and information systems. Prerequisites: Successful completion of 30 credit hours or permission of instructor and qualifying score on the math assessment or MATH 023 or MATH 026.
In this introductory course in international business, the student acquires an overview of current international business patterns, different social systems within countries as they affect trade, and the major theories which explain how trade develops. The student is also introduced to material about how institutions, countries and individual corporate strategy are affected by trade patterns. Prerequisite: BA 101 or permission of instructor.
This course introduces the basic principles and techniques of quality improvement. It provides the basic concepts, terminology and history of quality improvement and management, with emphasis on relevant costs and benefits of quality improvements, and organization policies and procedures as they relate to quality enhancement. Prerequisite: BA 101 or permission of instructor.
Contemporary Issues in Business is the capstone course for students completing a business management certificate. This course integrates the principles of business management that students have acquired within their specific certificate concentration. Students complete research, projects, and a portfolio to demonstrate their business competencies. Prerequisite: Twelve (12) credits hours in BA and/or OS courses.
The student is introduced to the legal environment in which businesses operate. The course covers sources of law and the application of law to business. Areas examined include business crimes, contracts (under common law and the Uniform Commercial Code), sales, torts (including product liability), administrative, antitrust, environmental, and consumer protection laws.
Special Topics:Women and Business This course emphasizes critical issues, attitudes and practices which influence the successful integration of women into mid- and senior-level management. Through readings, case studies, and special projects, students explore the nature of gender related topics and their impact on effective management practices and business organizations. Relevant topics include power and authority, legal issues, communication, sexual harassment, and time and stress management.
Cooperative Education experiences are work-based learning experiences with an employer for a specific period of time. The experience may be paid and must be related to the career and specific curriculum in which the student is enrolled. It is an opportunity for the student to supplement/integrate classroom learning with learning from a related work setting. A student registers for one to four credits of Cooperative Education in the curriculum in which he/she is enrolled. Prerequisite: approval of program coordinator.
Cooperative Education experiences are work-based learning experiences with an employer for a specific period of time. The experience may be paid and must be related to the career and specific curriculum in which the student is enrolled. It is an opportunity for the student to supplement/integrate classroom learning with learning from a related work setting. A student registers for one to four credits of Cooperative Education in the curriculum in which he/she is enrolled. Prerequisite: approval of program coordinator.
Cooperative Education experiences are work-based learning experiences with an employer for a specific period of time. The experience may be paid and must be related to the career and specific curriculum in which the student is enrolled. It is an opportunity for the student to supplement/integrate classroom learning with learning from a related work setting. A student registers for one to four credits of Cooperative Education in the curriculum in which he/she is enrolled. Prerequisite: approval of program coordinator.
Cooperative Education experiences are work-based learning experiences with an employer for a specific period of time. The experience may be paid and must be related to the career and specific curriculum in which the student is enrolled. It is an opportunity for the student to supplement/integrate classroom learning with learning from a related work setting. A student registers for one to four credits of Cooperative Education in the curriculum in which he/she is enrolled. Prerequisite: approval of program coordinator.
CHEM - Chemistry
This preparatory courses is designed to permit access to other science courses. Basic principles of atomic structure and chemical change are presented as a foundation for the study of freshman chemistry or biology. May not be used to meet the graduation requirements. Prerequisite: qualifying score on the math assessment or MATH 022 or MATH 024.
A course for nonscience majors which allows students to enter the fascinating world of chemistry, the science of molecular change. Students gain an understanding of basic chemical principles and applications that promote an appreciation for the interface between chemistry, technology and society. Topics include air and water pollution, the natural world of organic-biochemistry, food, agriculture, nutrition, synthetic materials, drugs, medicine, nuclear power and radioactivity. The course includes a total of 45 lecture and 30 laboratory hours per semester. Course fee.
An introduction for students requiring a full year of chemistry. The structure of matter and its behavior from a chemical perspective is presented. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, periodic relationships, principles of chemical reactions, and properties of state and solutions. The laboratory illustrates the principles discussed in lecture. Course includes 45 hours of lecture and 45 hours of laboratory per semester. Prerequisite: two units of high school algebra or MATH 017 or Math 023 or Math 026. In addition, it is recommended that students have completed one year of high school chemistry or CHEM 010. Course fee.
The second semester course for students who require a full year of chemistry. Topics are chemical thermodynamics, kinetics, chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry, acid-base theory, nuclear reactions, and an introduction to basic principles and structures in organic and biochemistry. The laboratory consists of applications of topics discussed in lecture and introduction to the qualitative analysis of some common metals and nonmetals. Course includes 45 hours of lecture and 45 hours of laboratory per semester. Prerequisite: CHEM 111. Course fee.
The second semester course for students who require one year of chemistry for transfer to Nursing or Physical Therapy and Allied Health programs. A survey of additional chemical principles, acids, bases and buffers, nuclear chemistry with special emphasis given to organic chemistry, a study of the chemistry of carbon compound---hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, and esters---and the chemistry of the major classes of biologically important compounds. The course meets for a total of 45 lecture and 45 laboratory hours per semester. Prerequisite: CHEM 111. Usually offered in spring semester. Course fee.
Chemistry for Engineers is a one-semester course, with laboratory, covering general chemistry topics designed specifically for engineering students. Topics include atomic/molecular structure, the periodic table, chemical reactions, chemical bonding, equilibrium, kinetics, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and gas laws. A mathematical approach will be used throughout the course emphasizing data acquisition and manipulation, uncertainty and significant figures. The course includes an introduction to basic laboratory techniques, obtaining measurements, and safety. This course is for non-chemical engineering students; science majors needs to complete the CHEM 111 - CHEM 112 sequence. This course meets 45 lecture/discussion hours and 45 laboratory hours. Prerequisites: Qualifying score on the math assessment, or MATH 026 and high school algebra II and trigonometry, or high school precalculus. Course fee.
An introduction to the basic theories and techniques of analytical chemistry for the science major. Gravimetric, volumetric, and common instrumental techniques are included. The course meets for a total of 30 hours of lecture and 60 hours of laboratory per semester. Prerequisite: CHEM 112 or permission of instructor. Course fee.
This course, along with CHEM 208, presents a comprehensive survey of organic chemistry. The first semester stresses the physical and chemical properties of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. Emphasis is given to organic nomenclature, synthesis, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms and spectroscopy of organic compounds. The laboratory illustrates the common techniques used in the preparation, purification and characterization of typical compounds. Course includes 45 hours of lecture and 45 hours of laboratory per semester. Prerequisite: CHEM 112 or permission of instructor. Course fee.
A continuation of CHEM 207, this course covers the alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, and their derivatives and selected special topics. Syntheses and reaction mechanisms are stressed throughout the course. The laboratory includes organic syntheses and an introduction to organic qualitative analysis. Course includes 45 hours of lecture and 45 hours of laboratory per semester. Course fee. Prerequisite: CHEM 207 or permission of instructor.
CMST - Communication Studies
Students develop skills in this performance-based course of public communication concepts and techniques, including audience analysis, topic selection and research, organization of speech materials, delivery skills, and critical evaluation of speeches.
This course explores the basic elements and theories of interpersonal communication and provides students with the foundation for effective dyadic communication skills to establish and maintain personal and professional relationships. Culture and its influence on communication are highlighted throughout the course. Students are provided opportunities to refine their interpersonal communication skills through role-plays and other activities.
This course is designed to teach skills necessary for effective oral presentations in business and professional settings. Students present a variety of presentational forms including those for meetings, informative and persuasive speeches, and technical presentations. All activities are designed to provide maximum opportunity for practical application of skills learned.
This is an introductory course addressing the major theories related to various branches of Communication Studies that includes interpersonal, group, organizational, rhetorical, mass, gender, and intercultural communication. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and CMST 101, 105, or 106.
This course examines issues of physical and virtual teamwork. The course challenges students' understanding of their leadership competence and conflict resolution skills. Students explore the relationships among members, the processes they use, and the purposes for which they are together. Prerequisite: ENG 012, ENG 018, ENG 060 or a qualifying score on the writing assessment.
Students will examine the theory and research in nonverbal communication to help develop nonverbal skills. Areas of study include body, facial, and eye messages, artifactual and space messages, touch communication, paralanguage and silence, and time messages. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and CMST 101, 105, or 106.
CADD - Computer Aided Design & Draft
The content of the basic course includes learning CADD commands and working with the user-interface. File maintenance and plotting are used to create two-dimensional design models in a CADD environment using AutoCAD software. Course includes 30 lecture hours and 30 lab hours per semester. Course fee.
A continuation of Introduction to CADD with main emphasis on using CADD software to produce Advanced 2-D and introductory 3-D drawings. Course includes 30 lecture hours and 30 lab hours per semester. Prerequisite: CADD 101. Course fee.
(3 Credits)
CADD 131 introduces students to 3-dimensional Building Information Modeling (BIM) using the Revit software package. Students create and edit 3-dimensional building models. Students use these models to create complete sets of construction documents and presentation drawings. Prerequisite: CADD 101. Course fee.
An in-depth print reading course stressing the rules and methods used to interpret engineering drawings according to ANSI Y14.5M-1994 standards. Course includes 30 lecture hours and 30 labs hours per semester. Prerequisite: CADD 102. Course fee.
(3 Credits)
This course provides the student with the skills to develop three-dimensional solid models of a mechanical nature. Students learn to generate complex composite solids by performing Boolean operations on solid primitives. This building block approach to modeling utilizes constructive solid geometry and boundary representation concepts as the basis for defining the model. Course includes 30 lab hours and 30 lecture hours per semester. Prerequisite: CADD 102. Course fee.
This course explores the variety of tools that AutoCAD provides to customize the drawing environment. Students learn to set and understand system variables, customize the screen environment, create and install custom menus, and write simple AutoLISP programs. Course includes 30 lecture hours and 30 lab hours per semester. Prerequisite: CADD 102 or permission of instructor. Course fee.
AutoLISP for AutoCAD is a continuation of Customizing AutoCAD. The primary focus is on building a functional knowledge of the AutoLISP programming language and applying it to uses within AutoCAD. Students develop new AutoCAD commands and functions to automate the CADD process. Course includes 30 lecture hours and 30 lab hours per semester. Prerequisites: CADD 102 and CADD 252 or permission of instructor. Course fee.
This course will provide an in-depth look at Building Information Modeling (BIM) using Revit software. Topics introduced in Revit 1 will be explored more thoroughly and concepts important to developing a project level understanding of Revit will be introduced. Prerequisites: Cadd 101 and Cadd 131: Revit I. Course Fee.
(3 Credits)
This course is an introductory course in the use of Solidworks CADD software. It focuses on developing an understanding of the program interface and methods of developing 3-dimensional solid models. Students produce a series of 3D models to test and explore the various methods of assembling a model in Solidworks. Course includes 30 lecture hours and 30 lab hours per semester. Course fee.
Cooperative Education experiences are work-based learning experiences with an employer for a specific period of time. The experience may be paid and must be related to the career and specific curriculum in which the student is enrolled. It is an opportunity for the student to supplement/integrate classroom learning with learning from a related work setting. A student registers for one to four credits of Cooperative Education in the curriculum in which he/she is enrolled. Prerequisite: approval of program coordinator.
CIS - Computer Information Systems
This course is designed to develop the basic computer skills needed as preparation for college courses requiring facility with basic computer applications. The course focuses on computer navigation skills, word processing and file management skills, email, and Internet navigation. May not be used to meet graduation requirements.
This is a survey course of the characteristics, functions and applications of computers. It includes the concepts and principles of problem solving and computer programming. Emphasis is placed on microcomputers and application software packages, such as word processors, spreadsheets, and graphics. Course fee.
This course examines the importance of computer operating systems. Discussion includes how basic computer concepts relate to an operating system and what functions the systems perform. Operating systems for PCs and UNIX-based systems are discussed. Prerequisites: CIS 102. Course fee.
This course presents the principles of a family of application software. The student examines and uses Microsoft word processing, spreadsheet, presentation, and data base software to design and implement solutions to business problems. Although the course introduces a basic introduction to the applications, advanced skills are presented throughout the course. Course fee.
This is an introductory course designed for users of UNIX. It is taught using the Linux operating system. The student learns to create, remove, edit and rename files, directories and subdirectories; compose, send, receive and print electronic messages; and compose, edit and format short text files using the UNIX editors. The UNIX shell, kernel and utility programs are covered. Shell programming is introduced. Course fee.
This course in computer programming uses the C language. The student learns to define, solve, code, enter, test, debug and document programming problems. Prerequisite: CIS 102 or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: CIS 115. Course fee.
This course presents the fundamentals of designing, creating, modifying and enhancing computerized presentations using Microsoft PowerPoint. The student examines the various applications for computerized presentations and employs advanced techniques including links to other applications and multimedia elements. Prerequisite: CIS 102 or permission of the instructor. Course fee.
This course introduces the responsibilities of a computer user support specialist and emphasizes PC troubleshooting. Students examine how to support, communicate with, and train non-computer professionals to use computers effectively. Students develop problem-solving skills and install, configure and troubleshoot microcomputers. Prerequisite: CIS 102. Course fee.
This course is designed to develop problem-solving skills in relation to designing computer programs. The student examines and uses program development techniques by developing hierarchy charts, flowcharts and pseudocode to solve common programming problems. This course is a co-requisite for programming languages classes. It is strongly recommended that students complete CIS 115 prior to taking a programming language.
This course introduces students to the basic fundamentals of Microsoft Project software. Addressed are the basic systematic applications and techniques used to manage projects efficiently, including planning, scheduling, and controlling organizational activities; task management, resource management, and cost estimation. Prerequisite: CIS 102 or permission of the instructor. Course fee.
This course covers advanced procedures involved in the use of Microsoft Project software, including applications that are used to manage projects efficiently with respect to schedules, resources, time and cost constraints, and controls. Fundamentals of managing multiple projects, formatting, printing, and customizing projects are introduced. Prerequisite: CIS 116 or permission of the instructor. Course fee.
This course provides an introduction to databases, including database design, creation, joining, tables, forms, reports, labels and queries. The student solves a variety of business problems using database products to design and create database files, locate and edit data, organize and display data, and modify and expand a database. Prerequisite: CIS 102 or permission of instructor. Course fee.
This is an introductory programming course taught in the popular language Java. Students learn basic program logic, design, testing, and debugging skills, as well as the specifics of program implementation in the Java language. Object Orientation is used throughout the course. Prerequisites: CIS 102 or permission of the instructor. Course fee.
Students use word processing software as a tool to prepare various business letters, memos, tables and reports. Decision-making skills are used to evaluate document formats and mailability. Course projects emphasize both the application of written communication skills and the ability to produce quality documents efficiently. Prerequisite: CIS 102. Course fee.
This course presents the principles of data communications and computer networks. The student examines network hardware, topologies, communications protocols and network operating systems, emphasizing TCP/IP networks for the microcomputer environment. The course provides a foundation for those preparing for the Computing Technology Industry Association's (CompTIA) Network+ Certification exam. Prerequisite: CIS 102 or permission of instructor. Course fee.
This course presents the applications and technologies of the Internet. The student examines the history, current issues and functions of the Internet and examines and uses Internet technologies including Web browsers, XHTML, FTP, HTML, TCP/IP, CSS and Java-script. The student explores strategies for successful Web site development and designs and creates Web sites. One semester. Prerequisite: CIS 102 or permission of the instructor. Course fee.
This course presents an introduction to Microsoft Excel, including designing structured spreadsheets, building formulas and functions, using spreadsheet publishing techniques, creating charts and a spreadsheet database. Also examined are advanced topics such as integrating Excel with other products and macros. Emphasis is placed on designing structured spreadsheets and developing spreadsheet solutions for a variety of business problems. Course fee.
This course familiarizes students with healthcare information systems including an introduction to the organizational structure, function and issues related to the healthcare environment. It emphasizes the structure and use of health information, health record data tools, data sources, storage and retrieval. It also includes system implementation and support, as well as security requirements for health information systems. Course fee.
This course introduces students to the analysis of data and information generated by health services and public health organizations. While focusing broadly on database design, development, and management of database systems, students will concentrate on healthcare application. Students will also be introduced to the use and structure of data elements, data sets, data standards, their relationships to primary and secondary record systems and examples of applications in health information processing. Prerequisite: CIS 161 Course Fee.
Special Topics: Introduction to C#.NET Programming This programming course introduces students to programming and graphical user interface design using C#.NET. Students learn procedural structures and graphical design layouts. In addition, students learn about generating software requirements and the software life cycle ranging from understanding the problem to deploying the solution. Prerequisites: CIS 111 or CSI 131.
This course covers the characteristics and functions of a microcomputer Assembly language. The student learns how to solve application problems using Assembly language. Laboratory consists of coding, keying and debugging programs. Prerequisite: CIS 102 or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: CIS 115. It is recommended that students have programming experience in at least one other programming language prior to taking this course. Course fee.
This course presents the principles of the Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC): systems planning, analysis, design, implementation, and operation/support. Students apply systems analysis skills, techniques, and concepts by analyzing case studies. The role of the systems analyst in developing IT (Information Technology) projects such as a payroll system, a student information database system, or a health care system is discussed. Prerequisites: CIS 102, CIS 115, plus nine credits in CIS electives, including a programming language.
This course is an introduction to application programming using Visual Basic.NET. The students learn the fundamentals of object-oriented technology and learn to define, solve, code, enter, test, and document programs. Topics include Graphical User Interface (GUI) controls and design concepts, calculations, decisions, menus, sub procedures, object-oriented programming, lists and loops and arrays. Prerequisite: CIS 102 or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: CIS 115. Course fee.
This course provides the student with an advanced set of tools for programming with Visual Basic.Net. The student studies advanced object-oriented programming design and development techniques using Multitier programs, Web Forms, Web services, databases, and collections. Prerequisite: CIS 205 or permission of the instructor. Course fee.
This course offers in-depth coverage of the current risks and threats to an organization's data as well as the strategies for safeguarding critical electronic assets. The course provides a foundation for those responsible for protecting network services, devices, traffic, and data. Additionally, Fundamentals of Network Security prepares students for further study in more specialized security fields. The course provides a foundation for those preparing for the Computing Technology Industry Association's (CompTIA) Security+ Certification exam. Prerequisite: CIS135 or permission of the instructor. Course fee.
This course provides an in-depth presentation of the capabilities of MS Windows Server Operating System. Topics include protocol configuration, name resolution, network services, remote access, routing, and security. The course provides a foundation that maybe useful for Microsoft Certification, but is not keyed to a particular Microsoft Exam. Prerequisite: CIS 102 or permission of the instructor. Course fee.
This is a second-semester programming course in the Java language. Students learn to design, create, and test Java programs using Object Orientation and other sophisticated programming strategies. Prerequisites: CIS 119 or CIS 111 or CIS 205 or CSI 131 or permission of instructor. Course fee.
This course develops advanced concepts in the Java programming language. The student studies programming design and development techniques in object-oriented technology using graphics, exception handling, multithreading and input/output streams. Prerequisite: CIS 214 or permission of the instructor. Course fee.
This course is an introduction to the development of programs for the web. Students study good programming design and development techniques for the web using advanced HTML, DHTML, JavaScript, and Perl. Prerequisites: CIS 115 and CIS 136 or permission of instructor. Course fee.
This course introduces the basic principles of developing Server-Side Web programs. Students learn to design, develop, test and debug Web applications using Server-Side technologies. Prerequisite: CIS 217 or permission of the instructor. Course fee.
This course in computer programming uses the C++ language. The student learns the fundamentals of object-oriented technology and learns to define, solve, code, enter, test and document programming problems. Prerequisites: CIS 102, CIS 115 and CIS 111 or permission of instructor. Course fee.
An introductory course designed for those knowledgeable in the UNIX operating system. Students create Shell programs as an interpreted programming language and write programs using UNIX commands. In addition, students modify and debug programs using shell variables, commands, arguments, filter, looping, positional parameters, nesting and debugging procedures. Prerequisite: CIS 110. Corequisite: CIS 115. Course fee.
This course in computer programming uses the Python language, which is a general purpose, object-oriented programming language, ideal for rapid prototype development, scripting, and cross-language software development. The student learns how to define, solve, code, test, and document programming problems using Python. Prerequisites: CIS 102 or permission of the instructor. Course fee.
This course presents advanced concepts and techniques of Microsoft Office, including MS Word, MS Excel, MS Access and MS PowerPoint. Integration between software packages is emphasized and the role of the Internet is examined. Students solve a variety of advanced business problems. Prerequisites: CIS 102 and CIS 106 or permission of instructor. Course fee.
Python is a "light-weight", general purpose, object-oriented programming language ideal for rapid prototype development, scripting, and cross-language software development. In this course, the student will learn how to define, solve, code, test, and document programming problems using Python. Prerequisite: CIS 102 or permission of instructor. Course fee.
Cooperative Education experiences are work-based learning experiences with an employer for a specific period of time. The experience may be paid and must be related to the career and specific curriculum in which the student is enrolled. It is an opportunity for the student to supplement/integrate classroom learning with learning from a related work setting. A student registers for one to four credits of Cooperative Education in the curriculum in which he/she is enrolled. Prerequisite: approval of program coordinator.
Cooperative Education experiences are work-based learning experiences with an employer for a specific period of time. The experience may be paid and must be related to the career and specific curriculum in which the student is enrolled. It is an opportunity for the student to supplement/integrate classroom learning with learning from a related work setting. A student registers for one to four credits of Cooperative Education in the curriculum in which he/she is enrolled. Prerequisite: approval of program coordinator.
Cooperative Education experiences are work-based learning experiences with an employer for a specific period of time. The experience may be paid and must be related to the career and specific curriculum in which the student is enrolled. It is an opportunity for the student to supplement/integrate classroom learning with learning from a related work setting. A student registers for one to four credits of Cooperative Education in the curriculum in which he/she is enrolled. Prerequisite: approval of program coordinator.
Cooperative Education experiences are work-based learning experiences with an employer for a specific period of time. The experiences may be paid and must be related to the career and specific curriculum in which the student is enrolled. It is an opportunity for the student to supplement/integrate classroom learning with learning from a related work setting. A student registers for one to four credits of Cooperative Education in the curriculum in which he/she is enrolled. Prerequisite: approval of program coordinator.
CSI - Computer Science
This is the first course in a sequence of two courses in computer science utilizing the syntax and semantics of the C programming language with emphasis on applications for Science, Mathematics and Engineering disciplines. The course provides an introduction to the principles of program design and development using procedural programming techniques. The course will provide an introduction to the following topics: life cycle program development, modularization, simple algorithm analysis, aggregated derived data types and sequential and random file processing. Usually offered in spring semester. Prerequisite/Corequisite: MATH 203. Note: Computer Science students completing CIS 111 can not receive credit for CSI 131.
The second in a two-course sequence in computer science utilizing the syntax and semantics of the object-oriented C++ programming language. Topics include classes, dynamic data structure, overloading, inheritance, stream input/output and file processing. Usually offered in fall semester. Prerequisites: CSI 131. Corequisite: MATH 204.
CJ - Criminal Justice
This course is an introduction to the criminal justice system from its ancient origins to reform in England and its present development in the United States. The course covers agencies involved in the administration of justice at all levels of government. Students are oriented to the purposes, requirements and opportunities in this field.
This course is a study of the treatment, security, custody and discipline of the convicted law violator. The course covers the development of correctional theory and practice, philosophical and social frameworks, the administrative function, community-based corrections, and the analysis of the correctional client.
The constitutional aspects of arrest, search and seizure are considered, together with interrogation and confession, self-incrimination and right to counsel. Students learn rules of evidence as they apply to law enforcement officers in the performance of their investigatory duties and their testimony in court.
The purpose and activities of the police component of the criminal justice system are examined. Included is an analysis of the following concepts, issues or problems: police organization and management; the functions of the police; the relationship of police operations to function, including patrol, investigation, traffic, juvenile service and special units; and the evaluation of police effectiveness, budgeting and utilization of resources. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or permission of instructor.
The substantive law is discussed: how and why laws are created with emphasis on specific offenses against persons and property. Also covered: what constitutes a violation of the law and how police must satisfy the legal requirements imposed by the elements of the statutes so that the state may successfully prosecute a criminal case. Landmark U.S. Supreme Court and selected state court cases are studied.
This course is an introduction to crime scene investigation techniques. Emphasis is placed on how to collect and preserve physical evidence, examine the evidence and record the crime scene.
Social complexities and problems facing today's police officer are studied in light of the sociological factors operating in urban, suburban and rural areas. Also included are police community relations programs such as review boards and civil disorder control procedures.
Topics include the fundamental principles and concepts of investigation, methods of investigation, search of the crime scene, and collection and preservation of evidence. Interviews and interrogations, sources of information, techniques of surveillance, stakeouts and raids are also included as are investigative techniques in specific crimes. Three lecture hours per week.
Criminology is a sociological study of the causes of crime and the relationships between criminal behavior and various social factors such as age, sex, race, religion, socioeconomic status, etc. Included are studies of crime rates, white-collar crime and victimless crimes. Prerequisite: SOC 101.
This course is designed to analyze the traditional and contemporary issues and problems in the law enforcement community. Topics include such areas as police corruption, use of deadly force, computer crime, terrorism and other forms of criminal behavior.
(3 Credits)
This course analyzes the decision-making process in criminal justice as it relates to discretion, due process, truthfulness, corruption and discrimination.
(3 Credits)
This course reviews the history, the current state of affairs, and the potential future of terrorism in the world. Students will become familiar with what terrorism and counter terrorism are and how our society and the individual are dealing with the threats.
This is a program of supervised, on-the-job experience, selected in accordance with the career objective of the student. The goal of this course is to provide the student an opportunity to earn college credit for performing direct service to the community and simultaneously applying classroom learning to daily situations such as interviewing clients, collecting data, and working with public service workers in police departments, courts, juvenile service, states attorney's office, corrections, etc. Nine classroom discussion hours, one hundred laboratory hours. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or permission of instructor.
DRAM - Drama
This course is a chronological and critical study of the development of drama from the early Greeks until the Restoration. Students explore a broad range of dramatic works from around the world. Prerequisite: minimum of C grade in ENG 101. Usually offered in fall semester.
This course is a chronological and critical study of the development of drama from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Students explore a broad range of dramatic works from around the world. Prerequisite: minimum of C grade in ENG 101. Usually offered in spring semester.
ES - Earth Science
A survey of the physical earth for nonscience majors is presented with emphasis on the waters and the atmosphere, including principles and concepts of geology; plate tectonics; environmental phenomena; earthquakes, volcanoes, seismic sea waves, landslides, surface processes, earth resources, wastes and hazards. Designed for students who share with the scientist the curiosity, wonder, and interest in the earth and the atmospheric changes.
This is an introductory laboratory course in the fundamentals of earth science and is especially appropriate for students new to earth science. Topics include earthquakes, hydrology, geology, weather phenomena and the oceans. The course meets for a total of 30 laboratory hours per semester. Prerequisite or co-requisite: ES 105. Course Fee.
This course provides an exploration of selected topics in the earth and astronomical sciences. Studies will include plate tectonics, hydrologic cycle, earth history, earth resources, and fundamental characteristics of stars, galaxies, and planets. Students will investigate how this all fits together and our place in the universe. The course is taught in a "hands-on," inquiry based, constructivist method. Students completing ES 107 cannot earn credit for graduation for ES 105/106 or ASTR 151/152. Course meets Associate of Arts in Teaching (AAT) degree requirements. The course meets for a total of 45 lecture hours and 30 laboratory hours per semester. Course fee.
This introductory course surveys the structure, weather, and climate in our Earth's atmosphere. Topics include solar energy input and distribution to the Earth; the role of atmospheric moisture in cloud development and precipitation; the development of winds, global circulation, and the motion of air masses and fronts; severe weather processes, and human impact on climate changes. Course work includes laboratory experiences and a collaborative field exercise that includes weather observations. The course meets for a total of 45 lecture hours and 30 laboratory hours per semester. Course fee.
ECON - Economics
Macroeconomics is an introduction to economic principles with emphasis on the analysis of aggregate income and employment. Topics include theory of income and employment, role of money and banking system, monetary and fiscal policies, and the problems of economic growth and fluctuations. Students completing ECON 101 or 102 cannot earn graduation credit for ECON 107.
Microeconomics deals with resource allocation under the price system, price and output determination when markets are characterized by perfect and imperfect competition, and price and employment determination in the resource market. Current problems of poverty, environment, energy and urbanization are analyzed. Students completing ECON 101 or 102 cannot earn graduation credit for ECON 107.
This course is a history of the U.S. economic development from Colonial times to the present in a world context. Major topics are geography and natural resources, the agrarian age, the factory system, the industrial revolution, and the new post world war society.
This course studies economic theory as it applies to consumer decision making. Theory will be complemented by practical examples of consumer decisions on investing, saving and budgeting. Use of credit, insurance, housing, career and retirement planning within the decision-making process will be emphasized.
This course is an introduction to modern macro and microeconomic theory and practice. The micro concepts of supply and demand, cost structure, profit maximization and wage determination make up the first half of the course. The remainder covers macroeconomic problems of unemployment and inflation with theoretical and applied policy solutions: fiscal, monetary and supply-side. Students completing ECON 101 or 102 cannot earn graduation credit for ECON 107.
EDUC - Education
This course is a survey of the role of education in America. Consideration is given to basic philosophies underlying the requirements of effective learning -- teaching situations, developmental aspects of school age children, current trends in education, and the selection of education as a profession. Participants should anticipate spending the equivalent of four days in field placement with a minimum of 30 hours in a public school classroom.
This course is designed to provide students with knowledge of the development and needs of the young child from birth to age eight. Emphasis is on theories of child development, factors which influence the development of young children, environments which positively impact young children’s development, and the identification of children who are at risk for developmental delays. Readings and discussion on special concerns and current issues in the field of child development are offered. It is designed to train parents, foster caregivers, family and group day care providers, nursery and primary teachers and others. When taken with EDUC 104, the 90 classroom-hours program required by the Maryland State Department of Education, Office of Child Care, will be met. **Child Care Credentialing Information: This course includes 45 hours in core of knowledge training including 3 hours in Child Development: Introduction to Observation and Assessment of Children; 24 hours in additional core of knowledge training in Child Development; 3 hours in Curriculum: Developmentally Appropriate Practice (including children with special needs); 3 hours in additional core of knowledge training in Curriculum; 3 hours in Health, Safety & Nutrition: Nutrition & Active Learning; 3 hours in Special Needs: Including All Children & the ADA; 3 hours in Community: Anti-bias/Cultural Competence; and 3 hours in Community: Family & Community Partnerships.
This course is designed for parents, teachers, day care operators, prospective parents or teachers, and others interested in working with children. Through varied instructional materials and activities, students learn various means of stimulating the intellectual, physical, social and emotional development of children through eight years of age. When taken with EDUC 103, the 90 classroom-hours program required by the Maryland State Department of Education, Office of Child Care, will be met. **CHILD CARE CREDENTIALING INFORMATION: This course includes 45 hours in core of knowledge training including 3 hours in child Development: Introduction to Observation and Assessment of Children; 3 hours of Curriculum: Resources that Guide Daily Planning; 3 hours in Curriculum: Developmentally Appropriate Practice (including children with special needs); 3 hours in Curriculum: Taking Learning Outside; 18 hours in additional core of knowledge training in Curriculum; 3 hours in Special Needs: Supporting Children with Disabilities, Delays, or Special Health Care Needs; 3 hours in Professionalism: Environmental Rating Scales; 3 hours in Professionalism: The Child Care Provider as Professional; and 3 hours in additional core of knowledge training in Professionalism.
This course focuses on the theories and skills necessary for classroom management in an early childhood setting. Students are introduced to specific skills that support classroom management, including problem solving skills, record keeping, and observational and evaluation skills, while emphasizing child development issues. This course is designed for people working with children in daycare centers, nursery schools, prekindergarten, and kindergarten. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or permission of instructor. **CHILD CARE CREDENTIALING INFORMATION: This course includes 27 hours in core knowledge training including 3 hours in Child Development: Introduction to Observation and Assessment of Children; 3 hours in Child Development: Developmentally Appropriate Supervision; 9 hours in Child Development: Positive Child Guidance and Discipline Theory; 3 hours in additional core of knowledge training in child Development; 3 hours in additional core of knowledge training in Curriculum; 3 hours in Professionalism: Conflict Resolution Strategies; and 3 hours in additional core of knowledge training in Professionalism.
This course explores the role of the paraprofessional in education and introduces skills the paraprofessional needs to be successful. A variety of techniques for assisting with instruction, modifying instruction, fostering appropriate behavior, and collecting documentation are all covered. Professionalism and collaboration are stressed throughout. Usually offered during the fall semester.
This course is designed to provide an in-depth examination of human development from birth through age three years, exploring the best practices designed to meet the needs of infants and toddlers as related to their physical growth and development, mental health, and human relationships. Attention is given to the family and child's multicultural customs, gender equity and children with special needs, while insuring quality program development and implementation in out-of-home care environments. Content also focuses on the caregiver, the child, and the program provided to meet the learning needs of the infant and toddler. **CHILD CARE CREDENTIALING INFORMATION: This course includes 45 hours in core of knowledge training including 12 hours in additional core of knowledge training in Child Development; 3 hours in Curriculum: Resources that Guide Daily Planning; 3 hours in Curriculum: Developmentally Appropriate Practice (including children with special needs); 9 hours in additional core of knowledge training in Curriculum; 3 hours in Special Needs: Including All Children & the ADA; 3 hours in Special Needs: Supporting Children with Disabilities, Delays, or Special Health Care Needs; 3 hours in Professionalism: Conflict Resolution Strategies; 3 hours in Community: Anti-Bias/Cultural Competence; 3 hours in Community: Family & Community Partnerships; and 3 hours in additional core of knowledge training in Professionalism.
This course introduces students to the early childhood profession. It provides a historical perspective as well as current issues and trends in the field. Various roles of the early childhood professional are presented. Participants should anticipate spending the equivalent of four days in field placement with a minimum of 30 hours in an early childhood public school classroom. **CHILD CARE CREDENTIALING INFORMATION: This course includes 21 hours in core of knowledge training including 3 hours in Child Development: Introduction to Observation and Assessment of Children; 3 hours in Curriculum: Resources that Guide Daily Planning; 3 hours in Curriculum: Developmentally Appropriate Practice (including children with special needs); 3 hour in additional core of knowledge training in Curriculum; 3 hours in additional core of knowledge training Professionalism; 3 hours in Community: Anti-Bias/Cultural Competence; and 3 hours in Community: Family & Community Partnerships.
This course addresses the management skills necessary when functioning as a site manager in a child care facility. Students are introduced to training of staff, accounting for funds, purchasing, recruiting, staffing, budgeting, communicating with parents, fundraising, locating community resources and making positive referrals. Prerequisite: EDUC 108 or permission of instructor. **CHILD CARE CREDENTIALING INFORMATION: This course includes 30 hours in core of knowledge training including 3 hours in Child Development: Introduction to Observation and Assessment of Children; 3 hours in additional core of knowledge training in Child Development; 3 hours in Curriculum: Developmentally Appropriate Practice (including children with special needs); 3 hours in additional core of knowledge training in Health, Safety & Nutrition; 3 hours in Professionalism: Environmental Rating Scales; 3 hours in Professionalism: Child Care Provider as a Professional; 3 hours in Professionalism: Conflict Resolution Strategies; and 9 hours in additional core of knowledge training in Professionalism.
This field placement experience requires that the student spend a minimum of 135 hours in an early childhood setting teaching under the supervision of a site manager and a faculty member. This experience is a capstone course and is intended to offer the student a hands-on opportunity to apply information learned throughout the degree program including, but not limited to, developmentally appropriate practices. Prerequisites: EDUC103, EDUC104, and EDUC108. Students should be enrolled in the Early Childhood Education AAS degree program or have the permission of the instructor.
This field placement experience requires that the student spend a minimum of 135 hours in an early childhood setting completing administrative tasks under the supervision of a site manager and a faculty member. This experience is a capstone course and is intended to offer the student a hands-on opportunity to apply information learned throughout the degree program including, but not limited to, developmentally appropriate practices, management tasks and supervision skills. Prerequisites: EDUC200 and EDUC201. Students should be enrolled in the Early Childhood Education AAS degree program or have the permission of the instructor.
This course uses criteria consistent with findings of scientific research to select, evaluate, and compare instructional programs and materials for teaching reading. Successful students are proficient in enabling students to become strategic, fluent, and independent readers using a variety of texts and other materials. They are prepared to involve parents and members of the school and surrounding community to promote reading both inside and outside of school. This course is approved by the Maryland State Department of Education for individuals seeking re-certification and is intended for early childhood, elementary, and special education teachers. Prerequisite: students must be currently teaching or have permission of the Dean of the Educational and Transitional Studies Division. Usually offered as needed.
This course provides the participants with the knowledge and skills necessary to enable their students to read content-area textbooks. Participants learn and use a variety of strategies to develop intrinsic motivation in students and use instructional strategies appropriate to discipline textbooks. Participants also learn about and use a variety of methods for assessing content-area literacy to plan instruction and communicate with students, parents, and allied professionals. This course is approved by the Maryland State Department of Education for individuals seeking re-certification and is intended for secondary content area, special education and N-12 teachers. Prerequisite: students must be currently teaching or have permission of the Dean of the Educational and Transitional Studies Division. Usually offered in fall or spring semester.
This course is designed to assist pre-service and in-service teachers in understanding the reading acquisition process through observation and analysis of reading and written language development, and the study of current issues in reading research. Introduction to language structures including spoken syllables, phonemes, graphemes, and morphemes is included in this course. Participants apply knowledge of the core areas of language to reading acquisition in terms of first and second language acquisition, typical development and exceptionalities. This course is approved by the Maryland State Department of Education for individuals seeking initial certification and re-certification and is intended for early childhood, elementary, and special education teachers. Usually offered in the fall and spring semesters. **CHILD CARE CREDENTIALING INFORMATION: This course includes 12 hours in core of knowledge training including 3 hours in Child Development: Introduction to Observation and Assessment of Children; 3 hours in additional core of knowledge training in Child Development; and 6 hours in additional core of knowledge training in Curriculum.
This course is designed to give participants the ability to use criteria consistent with findings of scientific research to select, evaluate, and compare instructional programs and materials (e.g., children's literature) for teaching reading. Successful students will be proficient in enabling students to read a variety of textual materials and will be prepared to involve school and community members in promoting reading. This course is approved by the Maryland State Department of Education for individuals seeking re-certification and is intended for early childhood, elementary, and special education teachers, current daycare workers and future daycare workers only. Three lecture hours per week. Usually offered fall and spring semesters. **CHILD CARE CREDENTIALING INFORMATION: This course includes 12 hours in core of knowledge training including 3 hours in Curriculum: Developmentally Appropriate Practice (including children with special needs); 9 hours in additional core of knowledge training in Curriculum; and 3 hours in Community: Family & Community Partnerships.
Designed for secondary teachers in all content areas, the course expands on Teaching Reading in the Content Areas: Part I and focuses on reading strategies used in content-area instruction. The emphasis is on student acquisition of content-area reading. Participants implement and evaluate a coherent literacy plan. Participants also implement reading and writing strategies that promote student mastery of subject content. This course is approved by the Maryland State Department of Education for individuals seeking re-certification and is intended for secondary content area, special education and N-12 teachers. Prerequisite: students must be currently teaching or have permission of the Dean of the Educational and Transitional Studies Division. Usually offered in fall or spring semester.
This course provides a basic overview of the causes and treatments of behavioral difficulties in children and adolescents. Emphasis is placed on interventions that can be implemented by an educator, or daycare provider through high school. Attention is given to creating relationships with families and agencies that support the progress of the child. Usually offered during fall semester. Prerequisite: EDUC 103 or PSY 202 or permission of instructor. **CHILD CARE CREDENTIALING INFORMATION: This course includes 12 hours in core of knowledge training 3 hours in Child Development: Introduction to Observation and Assessment of Children; 6 hours in Child Development: Positive Child Guidance & Discipline Theory; and 6 hours in Special Needs: Supporting Children with Disabilities, Delays, or Special Health Care Needs.
This course is designed to assist pre-service and in-service teachers in becoming proficient consumers and users of classroom-based assessments and assessment data. Instruction focuses on building knowledge of the purposes of assessment, types of assessment tools, how to administer and use several valid, reliable, well-researched formal and informal assessments of reading and related skills, how to effectively interpret the results of assessments, and how to communicate assessment results in a variety of contexts. This course is approved by the Maryland State Department of Education for individuals seeking re-certification and is intended for early childhood, elementary, and special education teachers. Prerequisite: students must be currently teaching or have permission of the Dean of the Educational and Transitional Studies Division. Usually offered as needed.
This course introduces students to a broad spectrum of instructional methodologies for use in today's classrooms and to the frameworks that will guide their instructional decisions. Students learn to design instruction to meet the needs of diverse student populations and to apply instructional techniques to manage and teach these children. Prerequisite: students must be currently teaching or have permission of the Dean of the Educational and Transitional Studies Division. Usually offered in summer session.
This course provides students with knowledge about both formal and informal assessment principles and applications and how these help in making decisions about their teaching and student learning. Participants learn the concepts and applications of various methods of assessment as well as the reasons and cautions that are inherent in the assessments they construct and interpret. Prerequisite: students must be currently teaching or have permission of the Dean of the Educational and Transitional Studies Division. Usually offered in summer session.
This course is intended for new or provisional teachers in the public school system. Students have an opportunity to discuss lesson plans, student behavior, classroom management, and any other topic of importance during their first year teaching. The instructor is in contact with the students' assigned public school mentors and acts as resource for the students. Prerequisite: students must be currently teaching or have the permission of the Dean of the Educational and Transitional Studies Division. Usually offered in fall and spring semesters.
This course focuses on the child from ages five through twelve. Emphasis is placed on theories of physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development as well as approaches in program planning, curriculum development, and selection of age-appropriate materials and methods through which educational outcomes are attained. Elements of professionalism are also presented. Prerequisites: EDUC 103 and 104. **CHILD CARE CREDENTIALING INFORMATION: This course includes 45 hours in core of knowledge training including 12 hours in additional core of knowledge training in Child Development; 3 hours in Curriculum: Resources that Guide Daily Planning; 3 hours in Curriculum: Developmentally Appropriate Practice (including children with special needs); 9 hours in additional core of knowledge training in Curriculum; 3 hours in Special Needs: Including All Children & the ADA; 3 hours in Special Needs: Supporting Children with Disabilities, Delays, or Special Health Care Needs; 3 hours in additional core of knowledge training in Professionalism; and 3 hours in additional core of knowledge training in Community.
This course examines the health, safety, and nutritional needs of children in the child care setting. It provides students with information concerning health and nutrition policies, the creation of safe learning environments, the development of lesson plans, and current issues in health, safety, and nutrition. Prerequisites: EDUC 103 and EDUC 104. **CHILD CARE CREDENTIALING INFORMATION: This course includes 36 hours of core of knowledge training including 3 hours in Child Development: Developmentally Appropriate Supervision; 6 hours in curriculum: Taking Learning Outside; 6 hours in Health, Safety & Nutrition: Nutrition & Active Learning; 6 hours in Health, Safety & Nutrition: Playground Safety; and 18 hours in additional core of knowledge training in Health, Safety & Nutrition.
This course provides a basic overview and understanding of special education programs and their design. Handicapping conditions and their characteristics are explained and discussed. Participants should anticipate spending a minimum of 30 hours in a special education setting. This course meets the requirements of three credits in special education for Maryland teachers seeking new or continuing certification. Prerequisite: EDUC 101 or EDUC 103 or EDUC 113 or PSY 207 or permission of instructor. **CHILD CARE CREDENTIALING INFORMATION: This course includes 21 hours of core of knowledge training including 6 hours in additional core of knowledge training in Curriculum; 3 hours in Special Needs: Including All Children & the ADA; 3 hours in Special Needs: Supporting Children with Disabilities, Delays, or Special needs; and 9 hours in additional core of knowledge training in Special Needs.
This course is for individuals who have at least a bachelor's degree and are exploring the profession of teaching as a career choice. Topics presented include introductory information on teaching strategies, assessment, classroom management and school culture. This one-credit course includes five days with a mentor teacher in a classroom. To register for EDUC 218, must have at least a bachelor's degree or have permission from the dean.
This course provides an introduction to the assessment methods most frequently used within the classroom. Students will learn to use a variety of assessment techniques, develop objective scoring tools, analyze assessment data, and suggest next steps based on assessment results. Assessment for the purposes of monitoring development, developing instruction, documenting progress towards IEP objectives, and grading are all covered. Usually offered during the spring semester. Prerequisite: EDUC 103 or PSY 202 or PSY 216 or permission of instructor.
This course provides an introduction to evidence based practices that allow teachers to meet the needs of every student in a diverse classroom. Learning styles, tiered instruction, co-teaching, and use of technology are covered. The skills necessary for supporting students with special learning needs, including those with disabilities and those who are English Language Learners, are emphasized. Usually offered during the fall semester. Prerequisite: EDUC 101 or EDUC 104 or EDUC 113 or permission of instructor. Child Care Credentialing Information: This course includes 12 hours in core of knowledge training including 6 hours in additional core of knowledge training in Curriculum; and 6 hours in Special Needs: Supporting Children with Disabilities, Delays, or Special Health Care Needs.
This course is for individuals who have at least a bachelor's degree and are exploring the profession of teaching as a career choice. Topics presented include introductory information on teaching strategies, assessment, classroom management and school culture. This one-credit course includes seven and one-half hours of classroom instruction and five full days in a K-12 environment in a private school setting.
(2 Credits)
This exploratory course is for individuals who have at least a bachelor's degree and are interested in acquiring secondary certification to teach in grades 7-12 in a particular discipline. It is a gateway course for the Maryland Approved Alternative Preparation Program with Harford County Public Schools pending MSDE approval. It provides a basic overview of what is needed for certification as well as covers the types of diversity in today's classroom, including socioeconomic status, English language learners, gifted and talented, and students with disabilities. This course will include eight hours of observation in a public school setting.
Course description not available at this time.
ELEC - Electronics
This course provides a broad introduction to electronics. It focuses on DC and AC circuit fundamentals, including electrical components, voltage, current, resistance, Ohm's Law, energy and power, series circuits, parallel circuits, series-parallel circuits, capacitors, inductors, and transformers, RC, RL, RLC circuits and the application of circuit theorems in AC analysis. Prerequisites: Qualifying score on the math assessment, or MATH 026. Course fee.
ENGR - Engineering
The fundamental principles of the graphic language are presented. Students acquire the necessary drafting skills to produce technical drawings. Topics include lettering, geometric construction, sketching, multiview projection, sectional views, auxiliary views, dimensioning and tolerancing. Usually offered in fall semester.
This course provides an introduction to engineering and an overview and application of the basic tools and techniques of engineering design and graphic communications. The fundamentals of engineering design, engineering drawing, AutoCAD, Excel spreadsheet, an introduction to MATLAB, and ethics in engineering are presented in this course. Students work on a team to use these tools on a design project with related modules in electrical/mechanical/structural topics. This course meets for 30 lecture hours and 60 laboratory hours. Prerequisites: qualifying score on the math assessment, or MATH 026 and high school or college trigonometry. Course fee.
(3 Credits)
Using the vector approach and free body diagrams, this course deals with formulation and application of the laws governing the equilibrium of physical objects under the influence of general forces. The major topics include application of vector diagrams, equilibrium force systems, analysis of frames and trusses, internal forces in beams, friction, centroids, moments of inertia and fluid statics. Prerequisites: ENGR 103 and MATH 203.
(3 Credits)
Students learn to formulate and apply the laws governing the motion of physical objects under the influence of general forces. Topics are Newton's laws of motion; multidimensional motion of particles and rigid bodies; kinematics and kinetics of particles, energy and momentum methods for particles; and mechanical vibrations. Prerequisites: ENGR 104 and PHYS 203.
The fundamentals of strength and deformation of various materials are presented in this course. The main topics covered are axial stress and deformation of bars, strains and generalized Hook's law, torsional stress and deformation in shafts, stress and deformation in beams, compound stresses, pressure vessels, statically indeterminate problems, and columns. Prerequisites: ENGR 104 and MATH 204.
This course is an introduction to a broad spectrum of engineering materials used in various industries. Emphasis is on the types, properties, production, and application of the materials. The topics include selection of materials, availability, elastic moduli, yield strength and ductility, hardness, fracture, toughness, fatigue, corrosion, deformation, and a CADD design project to incorporate various engineering materials. Usually offered in spring semester.
This course is intended for electrical engineering majors. It presents the fundamentals of circuit analysis and introduces the students to basic electronic equipment and measurement techniques, including simulation, construction, and testing of basic analog circuits. Topics include basic circuit elements, such as resistors, capacitors, inductors, sources, transformers, and operational amplifiers; V-I laws for RLC elements; response of RC, LC and RLC circuits; steady state analysis of DC and AC circuits. Students apply Ohm's Law and Kirchoff's Laws, apply analysis techniques including phasor, nodal and mesh analysis and Thevenin and Norton's Theorems, and perform transient analysis for first and second-order circuits. This course includes a design project and presentation. This course meets 45 lecture/discussion hours and 45 laboratory hours. Prerequisites: MATH 204 and co-or prerequisite PHYS 204. Course fee.
This course serves as an introduction to the concepts, principles and design elements governing the behavior of digital circuits. Topics include number systems, Boolean algebra, logic functions and gates, decoders and encoders, Karnaugh map, flip-flops, counters and shift registers, arithmetic and logical operations, binary codes and codes circuits, combinational and sequential logic systems and design, state diagrams, memory architecture, and programmable logic devices. This course includes laboratory projects with design elements. This course meets for 45 lecture/discussion and 30 laboratory hours. Prerequisites: ENGR 103 and ENGR 204. Course fee.
This course is an introduction to the fundamental methods of numerical analysis. Topics include roots of equations, matrix algebra and systems, interpolation and curve fitting, error analysis, numerical integration, and numerical methods for ordinary differential equations. Use of a Computer Algebra System is integrated throughout the course. This course meets 30 lecture/discussion and 30 laboratory hours. Prerequisite: MATH 203 and completion of or concurrent enrollment in MATH 204. Course fee.
This course presents an overview of signals and systems. Topics include continuous-time signals and linear time-invariant systems; singularity functions, differential equations and continuous convolution; Fourier series and Fourier transforms; Laplace transforms, state variables; frequency analysis. Students will apply the application of theory to problems in electrical engineering. This course meets for 60 lecture/discussion hours. Prerequisites: MATH 208, ENGR 204 and ENGR 206.
This course will introduce students to the interaction between energy in its various forms and the energy transformations that occur in engineering processes and systems. Topics covered include the first and second laws of thermodynamics, properties of pure substances, energy analysis of closed systems, mass and energy analysis of control volumes, entropy, exergy, gas power and refrigeration cycles, gas mixtures and chemical reactions. Conceptual understanding will be integrated with problem-solving. Course includes 45 hours of lecture. Prerequisite: CHEM 112 or CHEM 135 and MATH 204 and PHYS 203.
Course description not available at this time.
ENGT - Engineering Technology
This course introduces students to the history, responsibilities, and career opportunities within the engineering technology field. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking and problem-solving skills. Students study report writing, calculator usage, data collection and analysis, measurement systems, geometry, right triangle trigonometry, and basic computer skills, including word processing and spreadsheet applications. Also examined are the ethical standards that guide engineering practices. Prerequisite: Math 023 or MATH 024 or qualifying score on the math assessment. Corequisite: CIS 102 or permission of instructor. Course fee. This course may require field trip(s). A reasonable alternative to the required field trip(s) will be available.
This course examines the basic principles of blueprint reading. Topics include line types, orthographic projections, dimensioning methods, and notes. Students learn how to interpret different types of blueprints and schematics used in various engineering, technical or industrial environments. Students interpret the different types of standard symbols and abbreviations found on the drawings and schematics, such as electrical or mechanical drawings and wiring diagrams.
This course is an introduction into the world of 3D printing, including the equipment and software used in this exciting technology. Students will assemble a 3D printer kit, and learn and use various open source software to model and print objects. The class will be offered in a workshop format with hands-on lab based instruction and activities.
This course expands the application of 3D Printing techniques learned in ENGT 103. Students use calibration files and other techniques for print optimization and finishing. Basic 3D Scanning and enhancement of scanned files are introduced. Open source modeling software and meshing software are explored. Rapid Prototyping and Additive Manufacturing concepts used in the production process are explained. A capstone project is required. Prerequisite: ENGT 103
This course covers the basic concepts needed to understand the operation and programming techniques common to most Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC). An overview of Programmable Logic Controllers and the different number systems are covered. Topics include various number systems, programming fundamentals, timers, counters, sensors and their wiring, input/output modules and wiring, arithmetic instructions, and an overview of plant floor communications. Prerequisite: ELEC 105. Course fee.
This course covers the basic concepts needed to understand the operation and design of hydraulic and pneumatic systems. Topics include measurement of pressure flow, measurement systems, pumps, valves, filters, controlling pressure, fluid flow, actuators, seals, reservoirs, hoses, pneumatic controllers, and safety protocols. Prerequisite: ENGR 101. Course fee.
This course introduces students to the basics of LabVIEW programming language. LabVIEW is an interactive, graphical programming language that enables users to write sophisticated programs and applications required by the engineering technology field. LabVIEW's graphical programming environment has become an industry standard. Successful completion of this course prepares students for the Certified LabVIEW Associate Developer (CLAD) certification. Course fee.
This course will develop the student’s ability to read, interpret, create sketches, and use technical drawings found in a variety of industries. Topics include line types, orthographic projections, dimensioning methods, notes, and fee hand sketching. The student will learn how to visualize objects depicted in technical drawings (multi-views). This course will provide the student the opportunity to apply this knowledge and learn the skills needed to create free hand sketches.
This course will develop the student’s ability to create Block Diagrams, Wire Diagrams and Bill of Material project application. Student Learning Objectives Linked to Relevant Academic Outcomes Upon satisfactory completion of this course, the student will be able to: Develop Block Diagrams (Program Goal 3: Demonstrate competency in using technical tools, technology, methods and processes. Create Wire Diagrams (Program Goal 3) Identify Bill of Material (Program Goal 3)
This course is designed for students in the Engineering Technology Program. The course focuses on establishing a hands-on background in the basic principles of mechanics as applied to an industrial setting. A broad range of tools and techniques are presented which introduce students to industry standard procedures and equipment. Topics include hand tools, fasteners, basic fundamentals of mechanics, lubrication, bearings, seals, gaskets and packing, belt drives, chain drives, gears, couplings, clutches and brakes, and rigging. Prerequisites: ENGT 101 and MATH 103.
Quality Assurance for Technicians teaches basic quality assurance components as they apply to a manufacturing environment. This course introduces the basic engineering principles and technical skills in support of engineers and other professionals engaged in maintaining consistent manufacturing standards. Students are introduced to quality tools, basic statistics and control charts, blueprint reading, geometric dimensioning and tolerancing, measurements, problem solving, and system auditing. Prerequisites: ENGT 101, ENGT 223, MATH 103. Course fee.
Cooperative Education experiences are work-based learning experiences with an employer for a specific period of time. The experience may be paid and must be related to the career and specific curriculum in which the student is enrolled. It is an opportunity for the student to supplement/integrate classroom learning with learning from a related work setting. A student registers for one to four credits of Cooperative Education in the curriculum in which he/she is enrolled. Prerequisite: approval of program coordinator.
ENG - English
This course is designed to develop sentence writing skills needed as preparation for ENG 012. It concentrates on grammar and mechanics, sentence combining and editing skills. In order to ensure proper placement, students are asked to write a sample paragraph on the first day of class. May not be used to meet graduation requirements.
This course is required of students who score below a determined minimum reading level on the standardized reading placement test. The emphasis is on vocabulary development, word attack skills, literal reading skills and critical reading skills. May not be used to meet graduation requirements.
This course is required of students who score within a determined range on the standardized reading placement test. Students study and apply basic skills needed to read college-level textbooks effectively and efficiently. May not be used to meet graduation requirements. Prerequisite: students must have successfully completed ENG 002 or received a qualifying score on the reading assessment.
(0 Credit)
This course is designed to develop the basic writing skills needed as preparation for English 101: English Composition. ENG 012 concentrates on paragraph organization and development with some emphasis on vocabulary and grammar. In order to ensure proper placement, students are asked to write a sample essay the first day of class. May not be used to meet graduation requirements. Prerequisite: students must have successfully completed ENG 001 or received a qualifying score on the writing assessment.
This course is required of students who score below a determined minimum reading level on the standardized reading (ACR) and writing (ACE) placement tests. The emphasis is on vocabulary development, word attack skills, literal reading skills, and critical reading skills. This course is also designed to develop sentence writing skills. It concentrates on grammar and mechanics, sentence combining, and editing skills. In order to ensure proper placement, students are asked to write a sample paragraph on the first day of class. This course carries institutional credit only, which means that the credits are not calculated in the number of hours earned toward graduation. However, they do count toward full-time student status and for financial aid requirements. May not be used to meet graduation requirements.
Intended specifically for students who test into both ENG 012 and ENG 003, this course integrates reading, writing, and study skills instruction. Students study and apply basic reading and writing skills to read college-level textbooks effectively and to develop college-level writing skills. May not be used for graduation credit. Prerequisite: qualifying score on the reading and writing assessments.
Intended specifically for ESL students, the course is designed to develop sentence-level communication skills needed as preparation for ENG 060 or ENG 012 and concentrates on vocabulary, grammar, and mechanics as well as sentence combining and editing skills. May not be used to meet graduation requirements.
Intended specifically for ESL students, the course is designed to develop basic writing skills needed as preparation for the college composition course and concentrates on paragraph organization and development with emphasis on vocabulary and grammar. May not be used to meet graduation requirements. Prerequisite: successful completion of ENG 059, ENG 001 or a qualifying score on the writing assessment.
This course is designed to develop the basic writing skills needed as preparation for English 101: English Composition. This bridge course concentrates on paragraph organization and development with some emphasis on vocabulary and grammar. In order to ensure proper placement, students are asked to write a sample essay the first day of class. May not be used to meet graduation requirements. Prerequisite: Students must have successfully completed ENG 001 or received a qualifying score of between 85-89 on the ACE.
This course is required of students who score below a determined minimum reading level on the standardized reading (ACR) and writing (ACE) placement tets. The emphasis is on vocabulary development, word attack skills, literal reading skills and critical reading skills. This course is also designed to develop sentence writing skills. It concentrates on grammar and mechanics, sentence combining, and editing skills. In order to ensure proper placement, students are asked to write a sample paragraph on the first day of class. This course carries institutional credit only, which means that the credits are not calculated in the number of hours earned toward graduation. However, they do count toward full-time student status and for financial aid requirements. May not be used to meet graduation requirements.
This course is designed to develop mature writing skills in the essay form, including the documented essay. Through writing a series of essays in a variety of modes, such as argumentative essay, the process analysis, the research paper, and the summary analysis, students achieve proficiency in presenting and supporting their own ideas and incorporating the ideas of others into their essays. Prerequisites: ENG 012, ENG 018, ENG 060 or a qualifying score on the writing assessment.
This course focuses on the critical analysis of literary genres, emphasizing poetry, short fiction and drama. Students explore literary works from various cultures through discussions and critical writing activities. Prerequisite: minimum of C grade in ENG 101.
This course is an introduction to creative writing beyond the boundaries of standard composition. Students explore narrative and expository techniques, short stories, plays and poetry. Prerequisite: minimum of C grade in ENG 101. Refer to ENG 110, 113, 231, 232, 235, or 236 for courses at a more advanced level in poetry, fiction and creative non-fiction.
This course emphasizes the use of exposition and argumentation, along with library research and documentation techniques, in developing clear and effective research reports, term papers, and other analytical writing. This course is recommended for those desiring to transfer to a four-year institution or those desiring additional training in writing skills. Prerequisite: minimum of C grade in ENG 101.
(3 Credits)
This introductory-level, genre-specific course requires students to participate in a series of weekly workshops designed to improve their skills in poetry. Students analyze market trends in poetry publications. Prerequisite: minimum of C grade in ENG 107.
This introductory-level, genre-specific course requires students to participate in a series of weekly workshops designed to improve their skills in fiction and creative nonfiction. Students analyze market trends in literary publications. Prerequisite: minimum of C grade in ENG 107.
Course description not available at this time.
This course examines selected major works from the Old Testament and African legends to Cervantes and Shakespeare. It traces the origins and developments of Western concepts and conflicts as revealed in the great literature of the Western world. Prerequisite: minimum of C grade in ENG 101. Usually offered in fall semester.
This course examines shifts in values and concerns from the end of the Renaissance to the present. Writers who may be studied include Machiavelli, Moliere, Voltaire, Kafka, Chekhov, Tagore, Xun, and Mahfouz. Prerequisite: minimum grade of C in ENG 101. Usually offered in spring semester.
This course is a chronological and critical study of writers, Anglo-Saxon through Neoclassical, and their personal, literary and cultural importance. Prerequisite: minimum of C grade in ENG 101. Usually offered in spring semester.
This course is a chronological and critical study of English writers, Romantic to the present, and their personal, literary and cultural importance. Prerequisite: minimum of C grade in ENG 101.
This course examines major American writers, Colonial through the Civil War periods, as well as cultural and philosophic ideas reflected in the literature of the periods. Prerequisite: minimum of C grade in ENG 101. Usually offered in fall semester.
This course examines the major American writers of the late 19th and 20th centuries as well as cultural and philosophic ideas reflected in the literature of these periods. Prerequisite: minimum of C grade in ENG 101.
This course is a chronological exploration of dominant styles and ideas in architecture, art, philosophy, music and literature from Western and Non-Western cultures from antiquity to the Renaissance. Emphasis is given to the study of concrete examples and the critical processes used to understand these works and their current relevance. Prerequisite: minimum of C grade in ENG 101. Usually offered in fall semester.
This course is a retrospective view of influential architects, artists, composers and writers of the 20th century whose ideas have been recognized and synthesized in the post modern culture. Emphasis is on the creative contributions of the individuals and the analytical processes used to understand these works. Prerequisite: minimum of C grade in ENG 101. Usually offered in spring semester.
This course emphasizes types of technically oriented, practical report writing skills necessary to develop progress reports, proposals and recommendation reports. Through individual assignments, students learn the techniques of definition, description of a mechanism and a process, clarification, analysis and interpretation. Prerequisites: minimum of C grade in ENG 101.
This course is a survey of literature for children in the higher elementary school grades through middle and high school, including classical and contemporary works from a variety of genres. Prerequisite: minimum of C grade in ENG 101.
This course provides an opportunity for study in some depth of the work of three major writers and at the same time, through biographical and critical materials, of the lives and periods which shaped their different visions. Consideration is given as well to what makes a writer "great," in the sense both of artistic excellence and cultural impact. Prerequisite: minimum of C grade in ENG 101.
This course emphasizes the critical study of 20th century literature from around the world, including representative works of Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Prerequisite: minimum of C grade in ENG 101.
Designed for the student who must communicate effectively in a business environment, this course emphasizes the principles common to written and oral communications. Topics include the nature of the communication process; listening, planning and writing; preparing correspondence, agreements and reports; communicating about employment; records of oral communications; and management of written communications. Prerequisite: minimum of C grade in ENG 101.
This course is a chronological and critical study of American women writers from the 19th and 20th centuries. The selections reflect the cultural diversity of society and literature in the United States. Prerequisite: minimum of C grade in ENG 101.
This intermediate-level, genre-specific course requires students to participate in a series of weekly workshops designed to improve their skills in fiction and creative nonfiction. Students analyze market trends in order to send out their own work appropriately. Prerequisites: minimum of C grade in ENG 107 and ENG 113.
This advanced-level, genre-specific course requires students to participate in a series of weekly workshops designed to improve their skills in fiction and creative nonfiction. Students analyze market trends in order to send out their own work appropriately. Students are responsible for editing the HCC literary magazine Feather and Talon. Prerequisites: minimum of C grade in ENG 107, ENG 113, and ENG 231.
This course is a survey of African-American literature from the mid-19th century until the present. Selected works include slave narratives, folklore, fiction, poetry and drama. The works are examined in historical context and in their relationship to the political, social and intellectual milieux in which they were produced. Prerequisite: minimum of C grade in ENG 101.
This course emphasizes the critical study of literature written by diverse American authors, including works by African-, Asian-, Hispanic-, European-, Native-Americans and emerging ethnic writers. Prerequisite: minimum of C grade in ENG 101.
(3 Credits)
This intermediate-level, genre-specific course requires students to participate in a series of weekly workshops designed to improve their skills in poetry. Students analyze market trends in order to send out their own work appropriately. Prerequisites: minimum of C grade in ENG 107 and ENG 110.
(3 Credits)
This advanced-level, genre-specific course requires students to participate in a series of weekly workshops designed to improve their skills in poetry. Students analyze market trends in order to send out their own work appropriately. Students are responsible for editing the HCC literary magazine Feather and Talon. Prerequisites: minimum of C grade in ENG 107, ENG 110, and ENG 235.
This course examines the relationship between literary works and their film adaptations within their historical and cultural contexts. Students critically read literary works, view films based on these literary works, and compare and contrast the elements of each artistic form. Prerequisite: minimum of C grade in ENG 101.
This course emphasizes the critical study of English translations of literature written by a variety of Latin American writers, including indigenous, Asian or Afro-Latin voices, from the 19th and 20th centuries. Genres studied include the novel, short story, poetry, testimonial narrative, and historical nonfiction. Readings, films, and discussion provide the cultural and historical context necessary for understanding Latin American literature from Mexico, the Caribbean, Central and South America. Prerequisite: minimum of C grade in ENG 101.
This course offers students an overview of the history of modern English and its influences, as well as a thorough review of the major elements of English grammar and mechanics. Prerequisite: minimum of C grade in ENG 101.
ENV - Environmental Sciences
This course is a basic human ecology course for the general student, presenting the basic principles of ecology as related to use and misuse of the environment. Environmental problems and proposed solutions are studied and discussed.
This is an introductor laboratory course in environmental science. The course provides hands-on learning using experimentation, field excercises, science technology, and computer activities to demonstrate how humans impact environment. Co-requisite or pre-requisite:ENV 111. This course meets for a total of 30 laboratory hours. Course fee.
This course introduces the student to the fundamental principles of soil science. Topics include soil properties, soil fertility, and environmental concerns of using soils for agricultural production. Emphasis is placed upon the characteristics of Maryland soils which are similar to the soils in the Mid-Atlantic region. The importance of nutrient management and non-point source pollution of the Chesapeake Bay are covered. This course may require field trips. A reasonable alternative option to the required field trip will be available. The course meets for a total of 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of laboratory per semester. Course fee.
Course description not available at this time.
This course explores fundamental legal concepts relevant to environmental issues, including the relationship between statutes, regulations and court decisions. Various forms of enforcement used in environmental rules are discussed, such as command and control, liability and information disclosure. Specific issues include a survey of environmental statutes; regulations and case law; environmental audits and assessments; role of attorneys; unauthorized practice of law; and ethical conflicts between the attorney and the role of the scientist. Usually offered in fall semester.
This course provides education and training to prepare the student to work with hazardous materials and hazardous waste, safely and in full compliance with the law. Topics include an overview of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act, Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations, basic chemistry of hazardous materials, hazardous waste management and spill response procedures. Course meets for 45 hours of lecture and 45 hours of laboratory per semester. Prerequisite: Chemistry 111. Usually offered in spring semester. Course fee.
This course teaches proper environmental sampling techniques, data collection methodology, field instrumentation and laboratory sample testing, quality assurance and documentation. Groundwater, physical, chemical, and biological characterization of aquatic systems, priority pollutant analysis, and treatment technologies for toxic and hazardous wastes are covered. Field experiences are required. Some topics may integrate between this course and ENV 221. Course meets for 30 hours of lecture and 60 hours of laboratory per semester. Prerequisite: CHEM 111. Usually offered in spring semester. Course fee.
This course is a companion to ENV 220. Environmental sampling techniques, data collection methodologies, field instrumentation, and laboratory sample testing are explored with emphasis on atmospherics, noise and radiological monitoring, soil analysis, biological community structure evaluation, and pollution prevention. Course meets for 30 hours of lecture and 60 hours of laboratory per semester.Prerequisite: CHEM 111. Usually offered in fall semester. Course fee.
This is a capstone course in which students study an environmental problem and design a program which involves monitoring, analysis, instrumentation, data collection and synthesis of information into a report. The students provide oral and written presentations of their methodology, data and conclusions. Prerequisites: ENV 111, MATH 216, ENV 220 and ENV 221. Usually offered in spring semester. Course fee.
Cooperative Education experiences are work-based learning experiences with an employer for a specific period of time. The experience may be paid and must be related to the career and specific curriculum in which the student is enrolled. It is an opportunity for the student to supplement/integrate classroom learning with learning from a related work setting. A student registers for one to four credits of Cooperative Education in the curriculum in which he/she is enrolled. Prerequisite: approval of program coordinator.
Cooperative Education experiences are work-based learning experiences with an employer for a specific period of time. The experience may be paid and must be related to the career and specific curriculum in which the student is enrolled. It is an opportunity for the student to supplement/integrate classroom learning with learning from a related work setting. A student registers for one to four credits of Cooperative Education in the curriculum in which he/she is enrolled. Prerequisite: approval of program coordinator.
Course description not available at this time.
FIN - Finance
This course enables students to acquire an introduction to the various concepts associated with personal finance. Students apply financial management concepts in the areas of basic financial planning, creating a budget, preparing personal income tax returns, managing investment options and other liquid accounts, buying a house, the use of credit, purchasing insurance, managing investments, and saving for retirement.
This Special Topics course was replaced by FIN 100 Personal Finance.
FS - Forensic Science
A survey of the scientific principles employed by the forensic scientist in the evaluation of physical evidence associated with crime. This course is designed as an introduction to the crime laboratory and the techniques utilized by the forensic scientists in such areas as drug identification, forensic serology, hair and fiber identification, gunshot residues and other areas of forensic interest, as well as the principles involved in the collection and preservation of such evidence. Prerequisites: none required; it is recommended that the student have a high school or a college biology and/or chemistry course.
This course is an introductory laboratory course in the fundamentals of forensic science with a focus on a survey of scientific principles utilized in the evaluation of physical evidence associated with crime. Laboratory exercises focus on crime scene processing, evidence collection, photography, fingerprints, toolmarks, questioned documents, controlled dangerous substances (drugs), chain of command, and various types of trace evidence. Course meets for 30 hours per semester. Prerequisite or co-requisite: FS 100.
FR - French
This course continues to develop communicative proficiency in French at the elementary level. Students also explore aspects of the French culture. Prerequisite: FR 101 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Usually offered in spring semester.
This course continues to develop language skills in French at an advanced level. Cultural materials are also integrated into course content and activities. Prerequisite: FR 102 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Usually offered in fall semester.
This course emphasizes the continued refinement and development of language skills in French at an advanced level. Students also discuss cultural materials. Prerequisite: FR 201 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Usually offered in spring semester.
GEOG - Geography
Course emphasis includes basic physical elements of geography, including map reading and interpretation, as well as climate, landforms, soil and natural resources and their integrated patterns of world distribution.
This course features basic cultural elements of geography including population distribution, settlement, land use patterns and their correlation with the physical elements of the world.
This course is a survey of world geographical regions that examines geographic features and areas, as well as their significance.
This course introduces maps as effective tools to record and communicate spatial information. Emphasis is on map scale and measurement, referencing systems, map types, and new geotechniques. Topics include earth geometry, geodetic survey, map projections, location and land partitioning systems, map measurement, symbolization, (3D) terrain representation and contour interpretation, thematic maps, and cartogram maps. Geographic exercises requiring geotechnologies, digital cartography, remote sensing, image interpretation, geographic information, global positioning, and interactive internet mapping are discussed. Prerequisites: GEOG 101 and MATH 017 or MATH 018 or MATH 023 or MATH 026.
This course introduces students to selected computer hardware and software for the storage, retrieval, manipulation, analysis, and display of geographic data. Practical applications of geographic information systems (GIS) are emphasized. This course is not intended to provide students with extensive training in particular GIS software. However, laboratory projects involving student use of Windows-based GIS software on desktop computers and Web-based mapping applications are required and will reinforce important concepts. Prerequisites: GEOG 101 and GEOG 203. Course fee.
Introduction to the acquisition, interpretation and mapping of aerial and satellite images. Students will also learn to use Global Positioning Systems (GPS) in the field, apply error correction of GPS data, and build Geospatial Information Systems using GPS technology. This course meets for 30 lecture hours and 30 laboratory hours. Prerequisite: GEOG 204 grade of “C” or higher
This course builds upon the concepts introduced in GEOG 204. Students will learn in-depth spatial data handling, modeling, and analysis using ArcGIS software. This course meets for 30 lecture hours and 30 laboratory hours. Prerequisite: GEOG 204 grade of “C” or higher. Course fee.
This is a capstone course in which students will gain real world experience in the development, management, and implementation of a geospatial project. The project will be used to resolve geospatial problems in the public and private sectors, and/or in academia. This class meets for 30 lecture hours and 60 laboratory hours. Prerequisite: GEOG 220 grade of “C” or higher.
GER - German
This course develops communicative proficiency in German at the elementary level. Students also gain insights into German-speaking cultures. It is primarily designed for students who have never studied German. No prerequisite. Usually offered in fall semester.
This course continues to develop communicative proficiency in German at the elementary level. Students also explore aspects of the German culture. Prerequisite: GER 101 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Usually offered in spring semester.
This course continues to develop language skills in German at an advanced level. Cultural materials are also integrated into course content and activities. Prerequisite: GER 102 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Usually offered in fall semester.
This course emphasizes the continued refinement and development of language skills in German at an advanced level. Students also discuss cultural materials. Prerequisites: GER 201 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Usually offered in spring semester.
HLTH - Health
This course presents an overview of current health issues and problems facing our society. Topics include emergency care and CPR; prevention, recognition, and treatment of chronic and communicable disease; aging, marriage, and family lifestyles and choices; recognition and treatment of mental disorders; and stress management.
This course prepares students to meet the certification requirements from a nationally recognized organization. Topics include first aid, emergency medical care, Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), Automated External Defibrillator (AED) training, safety awareness and accident triage. Course fee.
This course combines two elements: the theoretical study of wellness and the application of wellness concepts. Topics include cardiovascular health, body composition, physical fitness, weight control, stress management, sexually transmitted diseases, addictive behaviors and chronic diseases. Other topics include teaching perceptual motor skills and fundamental movements. In a laboratory setting, students assess and evaluate their personal wellness state, and practice strategies (including a fitness program) to achieve an optimal level of wellness.
This course examines, from an interdisciplinary and global perspective, the health of the environment and how it affects human health. It addresses such issues as ozone depletion, global warming, human hunger, water pollution and shortages, and other indications of global malaise. Solutions are discussed and evaluated.
This course explores the expanding field of holistic health therapies that address the interplay of body, mind, and spirit. It reviews modern health threats (stress, obesity, poor nutrition, inactivity, toxins). It examines how complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) contrasts with and supplements traditional Western medicine. A wide range of therapies--including yoga, massage, and acupuncture--is covered, along with lifestyle changes that promote wellness.
This class introduces students to practical nutrition information. Emphasis on the role of nutrients in health management, weight control, and disease prevention, as well as behavioral influences on eating habits are discussed. Students assess personal nutritional status, develop individual nutrition plans, and learn positive eating behavior modification strategies.
This course examines different stressors and their impact on one's health. Mental health, stress related illnesses, and healthy and unhealthy choices are discussed. Stress management techniques are emphasized.
Course description not available at this time.
This course examines different stressors and their impact on one's health. Mental health, stress related illnesses, and healthy and unhealthy choices are discussed. Stress management techniques are emphasized.
This course will examine major aspects of human sexuality from biological, historical, and cultural perspectives. Topics include male anatomy and physiology, femaile anatomy and physiology, sexual behaviors, contraceptives, health related issues, conception, pregnancy, birth, gender development, and relationship sexuality.
The course examines the psychosocial factors that influence health behavior. Theoretical frameworks for behavior modification intervention programs are emphasized. Prerequisites: HLTH 101 or HLTH 103 or PSY 101 or permission of instructor, and ENG 003 or score on ACCUPLACER ACE qualifying student to take ENG 101.
HIST - History
This course is the first half of the Western Civilization survey, beginning with its foundations in the ancient Middle East, and ending with the emergence of the modern West, ca. 1700. Key topics covered in this course include the spread of Greco-Roman culture, the rise of Christianity, the Middle Ages and Renaissance, and the emergence of "modernity." Students will examine what it meant to be "Western" during the eras in question.
This course is the second half of the Western Civilization survey, from ca. 1648 to the twenty-first century. Key topics covered in this course include the Enlightenment and Age of Revolutions, industrialization and modernity, the world wars, and the Cold War. Students will analyze Europe's impact on the rest of the world via colonization and decolonization. Students will also focus on the religious, social and cultural concerns that have shaped the modern West.
This course is a survey of American history from the early British settlements of the 17th century through the Civil War. Key topics include: early British settlements in North America, British North America, American Revolution, the Constitution, the two-party system, War of 1812, market revolution, immigration, Jacksonian democracy, slavery and freedom, social reform, western expansion, North-South sectionalism and the Civil War. Students will also explore the development of the American republic in global context. Prerequisites: a qualifying score on the English assessment or ENG 012 or ENG 018 or ENG 101.
This course is a survey of United States history from the end of the Civil War (1865) through the beginning of the 21st century. Key topics include Civil War Reconstruction, industrialization, populism, western expansion, immigration, progressivism, imperialism, World War I, the Depression, World War II, civil rights, Cold War, Vietnam era, feminism, digital revolution, terrorism, and the 21st centry wars. Students will focus on the United States' international interactions and impacts in a global age.
This course has a global perspective, examining many different civilizations, cultures and societies around the world, comparing how they dealt with economic, social, political, technological, environmental and other major challenges, and how they organized their lives and interacted with other peoples from the early beginnings of humankind (ca 200,000 BCE) to the age of exploration (ca 1500 CE). Co-requisite: Eligibility for ENG 101.
This course has a global perspective, examining many different civilizations, cultures and societies around the world, comparing how they dealt with economic, social, political, technological, environmental and other major challenges, and how they organized their lives and interacted with other peoples from the age of exploration (ca 1500 CE) to the present. Co-requisite: Eligibility for ENG 101.
This course is a one-semester survey of the development of science and technology from the civilizations of the ancient Near East through the world of the late twentieth century. Theoretical and practical advances in science and technology are studied in their political, economic, social and intellectual contexts.
This course covers the foundations of western civilization from the end of the nomadic Paleolithic era (c. 20,000 BCE) through the rise of civilizations in the Neolithic and Bronze Ages, concluding with the rise and fall of the Roman Empire (476 CE). Students examine the political, social, economic, and technological forces which shaped the development of ancient civilizations, laying the foundation for the creation of the modern western world. Traveling in Greece and Italy provides students firsthand experience with the architecture, culture, physical remnants, and historical legacies of these civilizations. Course fee. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and meets HCC travel requirements.
This course provides an overview of Maryland and Harford County history in the broader context of American history. Students will explore Maryland's emergence as a colony and progression through the revolutionary era, early Republic, Civil Way, industrialization, military and government expansion, prosperity and depression to the beginning of the 21st century. Class activities will draw upon the rich historical resources and people of Harford County, central Maryland and the upper Chesapeake region.
This course covers world history since 1900. Topics include the World Wars; the rise of Communism, Fascism and religious fundamentalism; the Cold War; emergence of Third World nations; the United Nations, and other international agencies seeking protection of the disadvantaged. The environment, the women's movement, the scientific and technical revolution, and the search for peace are also studied.
This course will engage students in the study of key aspects of American military history from the American Revolution through the wars of the 21st century, including the War of 1812, Mexican War, Civil War, World War I, World War II, Korean War, Vietnam War, Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Students will investigate military strategies, leadership, personal military experiences, key battles, wartime dissent, politics, civil policy, wartime controversies, domestic and economic impacts of military events.
This course will cover Russian history from the rise of Imperial Russia in the late 17th century through the modern Russia of the 21st century. Key topics will include: Russia's ascendancy as an imperial power, 19th century Russian literature, serf emancipation, the Russian Revolution, Stalinist Soviet Union, Great Patriotic War (World War II), Sovient Union and the Cold War, the collapse of the Soviet Union and 21st century Russia, and cultural diversity in modern Russia.
This course will provide an opportunity for students to assess and appreciate the African-American experience from Colonial times to the present. Key topics include: the Middle Passage, the Revolutionary experience, the establishment of free African-American communities, slavery and abolitionism, the Civil War, Jim Crow and segregation, the Great Migration, wartime experiences, Harlem Renaissance, jazz and blues, civil rights, black nationalism, modern culture, rock-and-roll, hip hop culture, and the rise of a professional African-American culture.
All Americans are "ethnic" and have some racial, religious, national or cultural roots in at least one other culture. This course examines the American ethnic experience from Colonial times to the present. Students study how various racial and ethnic groups have influenced American social, economic and political development. Students have an opportunity to trace their own family and ethnic heritage.
This course provides an overview of the history of Central America and the Caribbean islands. Students will investigate indigenous civilizations and analyze the impact of western imperialism on regions. Specific topics include: indigenous peoples, the age of European exploration, the Atlantic world, slave trade, colonial competition, independence, imperial subjugation, 20th century political tumult, Cold War, modern nationalism, recent economic and policial progress and problems.
This course is a one-semester introductory survey of the history of Africa from ancient to modern times. It surveys the medieval kingdoms, empires, states, and its peoples and diverse cultures. Pre-Colonial and post-Colonial systems are examined.
This course is the story of the development of the predominantly Muslim Middle East (as well as North Africa), beginning in the seventh century and ending in the recent past. The role of Islam, and the relationship between Muslim and non-Muslim peoples in shaping religious, political and economic developments in this region are stressed. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and one of the following History courses: HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 109, or HIST 110.
This course introduces the student to the world of Public History. Public History is a specialty within the historical field, where professional historians interpret and present history to broad public audiences. The course will include activities on: the definition of Public History, physical exhibits, digital history, oral history, job opportunities, archival management, resource acquisition, project assessment and presentation of controversial topics. It will include intellectual and practical experiences for students interested in Public History careers. Prerequisites: HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 103, HIST 104, HIST 109, or 110
This course explores the history of the "four nations" of the British Isles-England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales-over the last six centuries, from the 15th century to the recent past. Students will focus on political, cultural, social, and economic developments, and assess how interactions amongst the "four nations" have shaped the history of the British Isles. Attempts to forge a broader "British" cultural and social identity (or to resist this process, and preserve one's original identity) will also be stressed. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and one of the following: HIST 102 or HIST 110.
This course uses multicultural perspectives to examine the politics, works, family, creativity and sexuality of American women's lives from the colonial period to the present. Co-requisite: eligibility for ENG 101.
(3 Credits)
Students will seek answers to timeless questions by exploring classic examples of espionage through the different periods of human history. Beginning with some classic, ancient examples, and working through the Renaissance, students will note the advances to the profession during the Elizabethan period and will consider how those forms of intelligence operations have influenced the course of history. From an American perspective, students will explore the intelligence activities during the Revolutionary War, the Civil War and World Wars I and II, ending during the Cold War. From a foreign perspective, students will cultivate an understanding of different nations’ espionage services and the roles they have played in foreign affairs throughout the same time period.
America in the Stormy Sixties (1950-1975) The 1960s was the United States' most dynamic and disruptive decade from the 1950s to the end of the 20th Century. This course deals with a series of dramatic events and changes, e.g. the missile crisis, assassination of JFK, the civil rights movement, the Great Society, the women's movement, the sexual revolution, Vietnam war and peace protests, environmental movement, the computer revolution, the drug scene, Rock 'n' Roll, Watergate - that almost brought about a national breakdown.
Empires in Global Perspective This course will analyze empires throughout history using a comparative approach over different chronological periods. The ways in which empires were built and maintained, and the ideas behind those empires, will be studied, as will the ways in which subject peoples collaborated with or resisted imperial control over time. Finally, the short- and long-term impact of empire in economic, military and social terms will be emphasized. Prerequisite: HIST 101 or HIST 102 or HIST 109 or HIST 110.
Students will seek answers to timeless questions by exploring classic examples of espionage through the different periods of human history. Beginning with some classic, ancient examples and working through the Renaissance, students will note the advances to the profession during the Elizabethan period and will consider how those forms of intelligence operations have influenced the couse of history. From an American perspective, students will explore the intelligence activities during the Revolutionary War, the Civil War, and World Wars I and II, ending during the Civil War. From a foreign perspective, students will cultivate an understanding of different nations' espionage services and the roles they have played in foreign affairs throughout the same period.
This course provides an opportunity for hands-on engagement in History. The course creates opportunities for students to work directly with regional Public History professionals to develop exhibits and otherwise earn credit for projects in Public History. Students will be able to apply their historical knowledge and skills to activities and project development. Permission of the instructor is required.
ISS - Information Systems Security
This course introduces students to the evolving field of cybersecurity. Students learn about cyber-attacks and techniques for identifying, detecting, and defending against common cybersecurity threats. Students learn about software and hardware, network, Internet, and wireless security as well as a foundation for a more advanced study of cybersecurity.
(4 Credits)
This course is the first of four courses leading to the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) designation and provides an introduction to computer networking. The course presents information on network terminology, fundamentals, media, cabling, Ethernet fundamentals, Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and routing fundamentals. Course includes 45 lecture hours and 30 lab hours per semester. Prerequisite: CIS 102 or permission of the instructor. Course fee.
(4 Credits)
This course is the second of four courses leading to the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) designation and provides an introduction to routers and routing basics. The course presents information on initial router configuration, Cisco Input/Output System (IOS) software management, routing protocol configuration, Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and access control lists (ACLs). Course includes 45 lecture hours and 30 lab hours per semester. Prerequisite: ISS 111 or permission of instructor. Course fee.
(4 Credits)
This course is the third of four courses leading to Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) designation and provides information on switching basics and intermediate routing. The course focuses on Internet Protocol (IP) addressing techniques, intermediate routing protocols, command-line interface configuration of switches, Ethernet switching, and Virtual Local Area Network (VLAN) Trunking Protocol (VTP). Course includes 45 lecture hours and 30 lab hours per semester. Prerequisite: ISS 112 or permission of instructor. Course fee.
(4 Credits)
This course is the fourth of four courses leading to the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) designation. The course focuses on advanced Internet Protocol (IP) addressing techniques, such as, Network Address Translation (NAT), Port Address Translation (PAT), and Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP), Wide Area Network (WAN) technology and terminology, Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP), Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN), Dial-on-Demand routing (DDR), Frame Relay, network management, and introduction to optical networking. Course includes 45 lecture hours and 30 lab hours per semester. Prerequisite: ISS 213 or permission of instructor. Course fee.
This course focuses on security-related issues and the essential skills needed to implement security in a network in an enterprise environment, such as risk analysis, security policies, penetration testing techniques, Transfer Control Protocol (TCP), packet analysis, cryptography, operating system (OS) hardening, virus protection, and disaster recovery. Prerequisite: CIS 210 or permission of instructor. Course fee.
This course focuses on the architecture for network defense including network attacks and defenses, firewall systems design and configuration, virtual private network (VPN) configuration, designing and configuring intrusion detection systems, intrusion signature, and network security policies and configurations. Prerequisite: ISS 220 or permission of instructor. Course fee.
This course introduces students to computer forensics, the emerging role of the computer forensics examiner, forensic evidence preservation, and legal and ethical foundations. This course provides a comparative study of information technology, evidence analysis, chain of custody, and data retrieval from computer hardware and software applications. Students have hands-on experiences using various computer forensic methods, evidence preservation techniques and documentation. Prerequisites: CIS 210, ISS 111 and ISS 112. Course fee.
IDS - Interdisciplinary Studies
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to explore the concept of leadership and to develop their leadership skills. This course integrates readings from the humanities, experiential exercises, films, and contemporary readings on leadership. Students develop leadership skills through study, observation, and application.
This seminar will be composed of 7 modules, each addressing a success skill that freshmen need to do well in their first year of college. The seminar will help students adapt to college level expectations, and a college level workload by focusing on time management, study skills, and campus connections. The seminar will run in two formats: as a stand-alone seminar and as a seminar that is linked to several classes that are enrolled heavily by freshmen.
This course provides a basic introduction to the emerging field of peace and conflict studies. Because of the variety of interpersonal, professional, political, and international arenas where conflict arises, this course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the subject. Disciplines that may be examined include but are not limited to business, history, international affairs, law, literature, philosophy, political science, psychology, religion, science, sociology, and the visual and performing arts. Specific issues include the roots and causes of conflict, symptoms and dynamics of conflict, and responses to conflict. This course may require field trip(s). A reasonable alternative option to the required field trip will be available. Prerequisite: ENG 101.
MC - Mass Communications
This course is an introduction to the physical, financial, social and governmental controls of radio, television, cable and satellite. Students study the history of radio and television, basic radio and television technology, programming, and the business side of the industries, including sales practices, ratings, personnel and careers in the electronic media and related fields. Classroom learning consists of lecture, discussion, listening and viewing assignments, game shows and occasional guests. Students may elect to work in some capacity on WHFC, the College's radio station, or Harford Cable Network, the Harford County public access cable TV station, or to write a term paper.
(3 Credits)
This course introduces students to basic techniques of recording, editing, and mixing audio. Instruction covers fundamentals of microphone usage, mixing console operation, and digital recording and editing. Lectures and labs focus on topics such as acoustics, audio in media, equipment demonstrations, and recording techniques. Students work individually and in groups on a range of audio assignments including the production of an audio portfolio. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab per semester. This course may require field trips. Course fee.
This is an introductory course in the fundamentals of television studio production and the operation of television equipment commonly found in a studio setting. Students explore fundamental usage of studios and equipment, and will operate cameras, TV audio, video controls systems, TV lighting and basic set design. Students participate individually and in groups in productions such as news and commercials, as well as interviews, some of which may air on the local cable system. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab per semester. Course fee.
This hands-on course introduces students to the preparation and execution of media performance skills. Students learn how to improve their vocal and visual presentation, record performances typical of the industry, and critique classroom and professional performances. Newscasts, commercials and interviews are typical projects with the possibility of airing on FM radio or cable television. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab per semester. Prerequisite: MC 102 or permission of instructor. Usually offered in spring semester. Course fee.
Students study the roles, responsibilities, and effects of print and broadcast journalism from a broad historical and critical perspective. Related topics include the Internet, advertising, and public relations. Ethical standards, business constraints, and current trends in journalism are also considered. Students may shadow a professional journalist and write for the college newspaper.
Course description not available at this time.
Course description not available at this time.
Course description not available at this time.
This capstone course focuses on short-form writing for the electronic media and the Internet, including television and radio commercials, web pages, press releases, outdoor advertising, and brochures for a local, non-profit agency. Students learn through assignments, lectures, quizzes, guest lectures, and a final multimedia campaign for a real client. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab per semester. Usually offered in fall semester. Prerequisites: MC 102 and MC 103.
Advanced Audio Production is an in-depth study of audio/sound/hearing and the application of audio principles to various media. Other topics include digital editing, mixing and multi-tracking; studios and acoustics; equipment needs such as consoles, microphones, speakers and recorders; the processing of signals; and on-location recording. Students learn through lecture/discussion and through hands-on usage of advanced equipment. Student projects may be prepared for WHFC programming. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab per semester. Prerequisite: MC 102 or permission of instructor. Usually offered in spring semester. Course fee.
This course is an advanced study and practicum in video production. Students are involved in pre-production, production and post-production, including an introduction to digital editing. Lecture/discussion ranges widely from the practical study of equipment usage to broader concepts such as video language and its application to modern video production. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab per semester. Prerequisite: MC 103 or permission of instructor. Course fee.
This course is a chronological survey of film from the technological development stage, through the silent era, to the studio dominated years, to the present day. Emphasis is placed on the appreciation of today's films through the viewing of films important to the development of film expression. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab per semester. This course may require field trips.
(3 Credits)
This course concentrates on principles, production, and editing of digital video. Students are involved in all aspects of digital production including shooting, digitizing and editing video on a digital nonlinear system. Student projects progress from simple to complex. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab per semester. This course may require field trips. Prerequisites: MC 204; or ART 108 and ART 207 or permission of instructor required.
This course is designed to train prospective student journalists in the organization, design and production of a college magazine. Students learn how to write in standard journalistic style, become familiar with ethical and legal standards in the publication of a college magazine, and exhibit expertise in the areas of magazine design, business management, advertising, photography, editing, and copyreading. All students work toward the production of the campus magazine, The Harford Owl. Prerequisites: Minimum of a C grade earned in ENG 101 or permission of the instructor.
This course is designed to refine the journalistic skills of prospective student journalists in the organization, design and production of a college magazine. Students review how to write in accepted journalistic style, continue to apply ethical and legal standards in the publication of a college magazine, and exhibit expertise in the areas of magazine design, business management, advertising, photography, editing, and copyreading. All students help supervise the production of the campus magazine, The Harford Owl. Prerequisites: Minimum of at least a C grade earned in MC 208 or permission of the instructor.
This course introduces students to a variety of social media platforms. Students will learn the professional and personal applications of social media, as well as their limitations. Related topics include the role of social media in advertising and public relations. Students may produce digital content for the college magazine's Facebook page and/or participate in other hands-on assignments. This course may require field trip(s).
Course description not available at this time.
Course description not available at this time.
Course description not available at this time.
Students receive individual assignments at a selected job site in the area of electronic media desired by the student. Intended as a capstone course for the Associate degree and Certificate programs, this course offers the student an opportunity to actually work in a professional environment prior to graduation. Minimum of nine hours per week or a total of 135 hours per semester of independent work and conference. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Students receive individual assignments at a selected job site in the area of advertising or sales promotion desired by the student. Intended as a capstone course for the Associate degree and Certificate programs, this course offers the student the opportunity to actually work in a professional environment prior to graduation. Minimum of nine hours per week or a total of 135 hours per semester of independent work and conference. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
This course is an advanced practicum in media production. In consultation with the instructor, students select a complex media assignment to complete within the semester. Execution of the project is on an independent study basis with the instructor guiding and instructing the student throughout. Minimum of three hours per week or a total of 45 hours per semester of independent work and conference. Prerequisites: MC 203 and MC 204. Course fee.
This course is an advanced practicum in media production. In consultation with the instructor, students select a complex media assignment to complete within the semester. Execution of the project is on an independent study basis with the instructor guiding and instructing the student throughout. Minimum of six hours per week or a total of 90 hours per semester of independent work and conference. Prerequisites: MC 203 and MC 204. Course fee.
This course is an advanced practicum in media production. In consultation with the instructor, students select a complex media assignment to complete within the semester. Execution of the project is on an independent study basis with the instructor guiding and instructing the student throughout. Minimum of nine hours per week or a total of 135 hours per semester of independent work and conference. Prerequisites: MC 203 and MC 204 or permission of instructor. Course fee.
MATH - Mathematics
This course provides the student with the foundation in arithmetic that is necessary for a study of MATH 002. It includes whole number concepts, fractions, decimals, percents, ratios and proportions and signed numbers. May not be used to meet graduation requirements.
This course provides the student with the foundation in elementary algebra that is necessary for MATH 017 and CHEM 010. It includes a study of real rational numbers, equations, polynomials, factoring, algebraic fractions and graphing. May not be used to meet graduation requirements. Prerequisite: students must have successfully completed MATH 001 or received a qualifying score on the math assessment.
(0 Credit)
This course provides students with a combined foundation in fundamentals of mathematics and basic algebraic expressions and equations that are necessary skills for the study of Math 018. Topics include integers and their applications in fractions, decimals, percents, graphing, basic algebraic expressions and equations. May not be used to meet graduation requirements. Prerequisite: qualifying score on the math assessment.
This course is designed to reinforce algebraic concepts necessary for success in Math 101 - College Algebra. It includes a study of equations and inequalities, exponents and polynomials, rational expressions, roots and radicals, and systems. May not be used to meet graduation requirements. Prerequisitie: A score of 65 or higher on the math assessment. Corequisite: Math 101.
This course provides students with the foundation in intermediate algebra that is necessary for the study of a college-level mathematics course. It includes a study of equations and inequalities, exponents and polynomials, rational expressions, roots and radicals, and systems. Graphing calculators are recommended for use in the course. May not be used to meet graduation requirements. Prerequisite: students must have successfully completed MATH 002 or achieved a qualifying score on the math assessment.
This course provides students with a combined foundation in introductory and intermediate algebra topics that are necessary skills for the study of a college-level mathematics course. Topics include real numbers, equations and inequalities, coordinate grid topics, exponents and polynomials, factoring, rational expressions, roots and radicals, systems of equations and quadratic equations. May not be used for graduation credit. Prerequisite: qualifying score on the math assessment or MATH 010.
This course provides an intensive review of intermediate algebraic topics and will provide students with the foundation necessary for success in college-level mathematics. It includes a study of equations and inequalities, exponents and polynomials, rational expressions, roots and radicals, and systems. TI83 graphing calculators are recommended for use in this course. May not be used to meet graduation requirements. Course cannot be repeated. Prerequisite: A grade of M in MATH 017 or qualifying score on math assessment.
(0 Credit)
This course provides students with a foundation necessary for study in MATH 021: Pre-Algebra II. It includes whole number concepts, fractions, decimals, percents, ratios and proportions, and signed numbers. May not be used for graduation credit. Course includes four lecture hours per week. This course requires outside class time for testing in the Test and Assessment Center. Prerequisite: qualifying score on the math assessment.
This course provides students with a foundation necessary for study in Math 022: Liberal Arts Track I and Math 024; Stem Track I. It includes the study of sets and properities of numbers, algebraic expressions, linear equations and inequalities in one variable, linear equations in two variables, and equations of lines. May not be used for graduation credit. Course includes 28 lecture hours. This course requires outside class time for testing in the Test and Assessment Center. Prerequisite: qualifying score on the math assessment or Math 020.
This course provides students with a foundation necessary for study in MATH 023: Liberal Arts Track II. It includes the study and application of exponents and exponential expressions, polynomials and polynomial expressions, functions, graphs, inverses, logarithms, and systems of equations and applications. The use of technology is integrated throughout the course. May not be used for graduation credit. Course includes 28 lecture hours. This course requires outside class time for testing in the Test and Assessment Center. Prerequisite: qualifying score on the math assessment or MATH 021.
This course provides students with a foundation necessary for study in a college level math course. It includes the study of polynomial factoring, quadratic equations, rational expressions, rational equations and applications, radical expressions, radical equations and applications. The use of technology is integrated throughout the course. May not be used for graduation credit. Course includes 28 lecture hours. This course requires outside class time for testing in the Test and Assessment Center. Prerequisite: qualifying score on the math assessment or MATH 022.
(0 Credit)
This course provides students with a foundation necessary for study in Math 025: Stem Track II. It includes the study of systems of equations, exponents and scientific notation, polynomials, and basic function content. May not be used for graduation credit. Course includes 28 lecture hours. This course requires outside class time for testing in the Test and Assessment Center. Prerequisite: qualifying score on the math assessment or MATH 021.
(0 Credit)
This course provides students with a foundation necessary for study in Math 026: Stem Track III. It includes the study of polynomial factoring, quadratic equations and applications, operations on rational expressions, solving rational equations and applications of rational equations. May not be used for graduation credit. Course includes 28 lecture hours. This course requires outside class time for testing in the Test and Assessment Center. Prerequisite: qualifying score on the math assessment or MATH 024.
This course provides students with a foundation necessary for study in a college level math course. It includes the study of radical expressions, radical equations and applications of radical equations, complex numbers and complex solutions to quadratic equations, and the study of functions, their graphs, and properties of functions. An overview of inverse, exponential, and logarithmic functions is studied as well. May not be used for graduation credit. Course includes four lecture hours per week. This course requires outside class time for testing in the Test and Assessment Center. Prerequisite: qualifying score on the math assessment or MATH 025.
This course will give students the mathematical foundation necessary for study of college level Introduction to Statistics. Topics include linear equations and inequalities, polynomials, exponents, radicals, the Cartesian plane, data collection methods and descriptive statistics, and introductory probability concepts. Technology such as Excel and a graphing calculator will be utilized throughout the course. Prerequisites: Qualifying score on the math assessment or MATH 021.
Course description not available at this time.
This course will provide students with the foundation necessary to succeed in college-level mathematics. Topics vary based upon student placement scores. Successful completion of a sequence of sections in Math 082 may be needed to fulfill Transitional Mathematics requirements based upon placement scores.
This course presents linear, quadratic, logarithmic, polynomial and inverse functions. Additional topics include linear systems and inequalities, complex numbers, and piecewise-defined functions. Emphasis is placed on solving application problems related to business and social sciences. Prerequisites: A qualifying score on the math assessment or Math 026.
This survey course of contemporary mathematics and applications is intended for non-math, non-science majors. Topics include logic, introductory probability and statistics, financial management, and mathematical modeling. Prerequisite: qualifying score on the math assessment or MATH 023 or MATH 026.
This course provides a foundation for analytic geometry and calculus. Topics include functions, graphs, trigonometric functions of angles and real numbers, degree and radian measure, right triangle applications, identities, inverse functions, analytical trigonometry and trigonometric equations. Prerequisite: qualifying score on the math assessment or MATH 026.
This course will provide students with concepts and skills necessary for the study of calculus. Topics include: functions and inverses, graphs, exponents and logarithms with applications, angles and triangles, and analytic trigonomety with applications. Prerequisite: Math 026 OR qualifying score on the math assessment.
This course is designed for students in Business Administration, Computer Information Systems and other appropriate transfer programs. Topics include graphing linear functions, systems of linear equations, linear programming, matrices and Markov chains, game theory, counting techniques, probability, logic and logic circuits. Prerequisite: qualifying score on the math assessment or MATH 026.
This course is designed to meet the needs of prospective elementary school teachers. It reflects the philosophy of the NCTM Standards of School Mathematics. Topics include sets, functions, equations, logic, numeration systems, number theory, fundamental operations with whole numbers, integers, fractions and decimals, estimations and mental computation. Problem solving strategies are incorporated throughout the course. Prerequisite: qualifying score on the math assessment or MATH 026.
This course is an introduction to calculus with analytic geometry. It includes a study of functions, limits, differentiation, integration, and applications of differentiation and integration. Prerequisite: MATH 109 or MATH 101 and MATH 103, or equivalent.
This course continues the study of calculus with analytic geometry. It includes logarithmic, exponential, inverse, and hyperbolic functions, techniques of integration, improper integrals, infinite series and conic sections. Prerequisite: MATH 203.
(4 Credits)
This course provides students with the basic concepts of the calculus of vector functions. Topical categories include partial derivatives and multiple integrals with applications, line and surface integrals, and Green's Theorem. Prerequisite: MATH 204.
This course provides the student with the fundamentals of ordinary differential equations. Topical categories include first order differential equations, high order linear differential equations with constant coefficients and applications, the Laplace Transform, the Taylor Series and numerical methods. Prerequisite: MATH 204.
This course develops the basic mathematical background and maturity for use in later Computer Science courses. Topics include proof by induction, axiomatic definition, sets, graphs, programs and recursion. Prerequisite: MATH 203 or permission of instructor.
This course explores geometric concepts inductively and deductively. Topics include two- and three-dimensional geometry using techniques of synthetic, coordinate and transformational geometries, measurement and the use of technology to explore geometric concepts. Prerequisite: qualifying score on the math assessment placement test or MATH 026.
This course is designed for students in the biological, social, and management sciences. Differential and integral calculus with emphasis on differentiation techniques and the use of calculus in the above fields form an important part of the course. Exponential and logarithmic functions, partial derivatives are included. Technology will be utilized to enhance understanding of the concepts and their applications related to their future career. This course is not open to math, chemistry, engineering, or physics majors. Prerequisites: MATH 101, or MATH 111, or MATH 103, or MATH 109, or STEM Divisional Math Placement Exam.
This course provides the student with the fundamental concepts and methods of statistical analysis. Course topics: measures of central tendency and variation, graphical representation of data, least squares regression, correlation, probability distributions, sampling techniques, parameter estimation, and hypothesis testing. Technology and statistical literacy will be integrated throughout the course. Prerequisite: qualifying score on the math assessment or MATH 023, MATH 026 or MATH 027.
(4 Credits)
This course presents basic concepts of linear algebra. Included are systems of linear equations, vector space, matrices, determinants, linear transformations, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. Prerequisite: MATH 203. Usually offered in spring semester.
MAS - Medical Assisting
This course introduces the student to medical assisting. Topics include choosing a career as a medical assistant; working in today's healthcare environment; understanding legal and ethical issues; communicating with clients, physicians and staff; emerging trends in medicine; and control and measurement of blood pressure. Emphasis throughout this course is placed on the professional standards of conduct essential to a career in medical assisting. Course includes 45 hours of lecture per semester.
This course introduces the student to basic clinical skills performed by the medical assistant. Topics covered include the medical assistant's role in medical records and documentation, obtaining and documenting medical history, vital signs and anthropometric measurements, assisting with general exams, client teaching, medical asepsis and infection control,medical office emergencies, and life-span concepts. Emphasis throughout this course is placed on the essential clinical skills for a successful career in medical assisting. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of laboratory per semester. Prerequisites: BIO 108 and BIO 116 OR BIO 203 and BIO 204, MAS 120, AHS 101, Healthcare Provider Level CPR/First Aid. Course fee.
This course focuses on advanced clinical skills for the medical assistant. Topics include principles and practices of surgical asepsis, minor surgical assisting, instrument identification and function, electrocardiography techniques, common medical specialty disorders, and medical assisting skills employed in the medical specialties. Emphasis is placed on clinical competence required for employment in medical specialty practice. Course includes 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of laboratory per semester. Prerequisite: MAS 122. Course fee.
(2 Credits)
This course provides an overview of medical insurance billing and related software used in the healthcare industry. Topics include the health care environment, an introduction to medical claims coding, major insurance carriers and reimbursement methodologies, the life cycle of insurance claims, account receivables, and the use of proper insurance terminology. Practice management software is used so students can experience file building, data entry, electronic claims submission and report generation. Course includes 30 hours of lecture per semester. Prerequisite: AHS 101 or permission of instructor.
(3 Credits)
This course provides students with a basic knowledge of the descriptive terms and identifying codes for valid reporting of medical services and procedures performed by physicians. The coding and classification of diseases, symptoms, operations and procedures are presented. Skills in analyzing medical records to identify data elements to be coded are developed. Legal and ethical considerations are discussed. Career opportunities and certifications in coding are presented. Course includes 45 hours of lecture per semester. Prerequisite: AHS 101 or permission of instructor.
This course introduces students to the role of the medical assistant in the laboratory. Topics include an overview of the clinical laboratory, laboratory standards and regulations, laboratory safety, and the collection, processing, and diagnostic procedures associated with clinical chemistry, urinalysis, hematology, serology, immunohematology, and microbiology. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of laboratory per semester. Prerequisite: MAS 124. Course fee.
This course integrates the principles and concepts of common pharmacologic interventions related to the practice of the Medical Assistant. Topics of study include dosage calculation, medication orders and errors, drug sources, schedules and dosages, medication preparation and administration. Emphasis is based on understanding of drug classification, drug action, reasons for administration, therapeutic effects, side effects, and client teaching for common medications. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of laboratory per semester. Prerequisite: MAS 120. Course fee.
This course provides students with 160 hours of required administrative and client care experience in a medical office and fifteen additional instructional hours focused on employment and certification preparation. The student integrates and applies knowledge and skills from prerequisite coursework in an actual health care delivery setting. Administrative, clinical and laboratory skills are performed under the supervision of trained mentors to transition the student into the role of professional medical assistant. Course includes 15 hours of instruction and 160 hours of practicum per semester. Prerequisites: MAS 124, MAS 126, MAS 127, MAS 200, MAS 202, OS 135, Healthcare Provider Level CPR/First Aid. Offered fall, spring and summer sessions.
MUS - Music
Music Fundamentals includes the study of basic elements of music theory, rhythmic and pitch notation, major and minor scale intervals, basic chord structures, melodic and rhythmic dictation, as well as an introduction to the keyboard and singing.
Music Theory I is the study of the basic principles of chordal structure and progression including four-part writing of diatonic harmony; sight-singing, dictation, and keyboard exercises; rhythmic drills with basic conducting patterns; and a study of elementary music forms. Course includes 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab per semester. Usually offered in fall semester.
Music Theory II is a study of the advanced principles of elementary chordal structure and progression including four-part writing of diatonic chords in root position and inversion. This course provides exercises in sight-singing and dictation, rhythmic drills, and the study of musical form. Course includes 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab per semester. Prerequisite: MUS 103. Usually offered in spring semester.
(1 Credit)
The chorus performs both sacred and secular works from the 16th century to the present. Vocal problems are given attention. Members are expected to participate in concerts, Broadway-type productions, television appearances, etc., as scheduled by the director. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
(1 Credit)
The chorus performs both sacred and secular works from the 16th century to the present. Vocal problems are given attention. Members are expected to participate in concerts, Broadway-type productions, television appearances, etc., as scheduled by the director. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
The A Cappella Singers perform unaccompanied vocal music from the Renaissance to the present. Students develop vocal techniques. Participation in concerts, community events, and other appearances, as scheduled, is required. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
The A Cappella Singers perform unaccompanied vocal music from the Renaissance to the present. Students develop vocal techniques. Participation in concerts, community events, and other appearances, as scheduled, is required. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
(1 Credit)
The band provides practice in basic musicianship, intonation and tone color. It is a study of various types and styles of music written or arranged for band. Students are prepared for public performances. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
(1 Credit)
The band provides practice in basic musicianship, intonation and tone color. It is a study of various types and styles of music written or arranged for band. Students are prepared for public performances. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
The HCC Jazz Ensemble performs instrumental jazz from the earliest to contemporary forms. Students develop instrumental techniques and participate in concerts, theater productions and other appearances, as scheduled. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
The HCC Jazz Ensemble performs instrumental jazz from the earliest to contemporary forms. Students develop instrumental techniques and participate in concerts, theater productions and other appearances, as scheduled. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
This course consists of the performance of percussion repertoire and the development of techniques on various percussion instruments. Participation in concerts, theater productions and other appearances, as scheduled, is required. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
This course consists of the performance of percussion repertoire and the development of techniques on various percussion instruments. Participation in concerts, theater productions and other appearances, as scheduled, is required. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
(1 Credit)
This course is an introduction to basic theory and its application to the keyboard including notation, scales, chords and elementary piano skills. Grade one level piano pieces are used. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 15 hours of lab per semester. Course fee.
"Second Shift" performs vocal jazz from the earliest to contemporary forms. Students develop vocal jazz techniques. Participation is required in concerts, theater productions and other appearances, as scheduled. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
"Second Shift" performs vocal jazz from the earliest to contemporary forms. Students develop vocal jazz techniques. Participation is required in concerts, theater productions and other appearances, as scheduled. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
(1 Credit)
The orchestra performs the great orchestral masterpieces as well as new orchestral literature. Students gain practice in basic musicianship, intonation, tone, color and sensitivity. Students are prepared for public performance. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
(1 Credit)
The orchestra performs the great orchestral masterpieces as well as new orchestral literature. Students gain practice in basic musicianship, intonation, tone, color and sensitivity. Students are prepared for public performance. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
This course provides performance opportunities for students who wish to pursue a music program intended for performance, or other students with musical interest. Students collaboratively learn musical scenes and become comfortable with a professional rehearsal process, culminating in a public performance. The instructor provides feedback to aid students' development of complete dramatic material. Assigned scenes include selections from the classical, operatic, or musical theater repertoire. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
This course provides performance opportunities for students who wish to pursue a music program intended for performance, or other students with musical interest. Students collaboratively learn musical scenes and become comfortable with a professional rehearsal process, culminating in a public performance. The instructor provides feedback to aid students' development of complete dramatic material. Assigned scenes include selections from the classical, operatic, or musical theater repertoire. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
This course provides individualized instruction in vocal/ instrumental composition and arranging for students who wish to pursue a music degree, or for those with musical background and interest. One-half hour lesson and seven hours of work/practice per week. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Course fee.
This course provides individualized instruction in vocal/ instrumental composition and arranging for students who wish to pursue a music degree, or for those with musical background and interest. One-half hour lesson and seven hours of work/practice per week. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Course fee.
This course provides individualized instruction in vocal/ instrumental composition and arranging for students who wish to pursue a music degree, or for those with musical background and interest. One-half hour lesson and seven hours of work/practice per week. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Course fee.
This course provides individualized instruction in vocal/ instrumental composition and arranging for students who wish to pursue a music degree, or for those with musical background and interest. One-half hour lesson and seven hours of work/practice per week. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Course fee.
This course provides individualized instruction in vocal/ instrumental composition and arranging for students who wish to pursue a music degree, or for those with musical background and interest. One-half hour lesson and seven hours of work/practice per week. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Course fee.
This course provides individualized instruction in vocal/ instrumental composition and arranging for students who wish to pursue a music degree, or for those with musical background and interest. One-half hour lesson and seven hours of work/practice per week. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Course fee.
This course provides individualized instruction in vocal/ instrumental composition and arranging for students who wish to pursue a music degree, or for those with musical background and interest. One-half hour lesson and seven hours of work/practice per week. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Course fee.
This course provides individualized instruction in vocal/ instrumental composition and arranging for students who wish to pursue a music degree, or for those with musical background and interest. One-half hour lesson and seven hours of work/practice per week. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Course fee.
This course is designed to develop specific theoretical skills to be realized on the keyboard. Subjects include all varieties of chords, figured bass realization, transposition, and scales. Total contact hours per week: 30 minute individual lesson is scheduled biweekly with the instructor per regular semester. An additional 3 1/2 hours of practice per week is expected. Prerequisite: MUS 104 or corequisite and MUS 115, or permission of instructor. Course fee.
This course provides an ensemble experience by giving the guitar student an opportunity to perform in a group environment along with guitarists. Students are exposed to a variety of classical music literature, as well as styles and techniques associated with classical music, with an emphasis on guitar. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Course fee.
This course provides an ensemble experience by giving the guitar student an opportunity to perform in a group environment along with guitarists. Students are exposed to a variety of classical music literature, as well as styles and techniques associated with classical music, with an emphasis on guitar. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Course fee.
Students participating in this course have the opportunity to play a wide variety of classical music styles in a chamber setting, allowing for a high level of musical interaction within the ensemble. Students gain practice in basic musicianship, intonation, tone, color and sensitivity. Students develop instrumental techniques and participate in concerts, theater productions and other appearances as scheduled. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Course fee.
Students participating in this course have the opportunity to play a wide variety of classical music styles in a chamber setting, allowing for a high level of musical interaction within the ensemble. Students gain practice in basic musicianship, intonation, tone, color and sensitivity. Students develop instrumental techniques and participate in concerts, theater productions and other appearances as scheduled. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Course fee.
Course description not available at this time.
Course description not available at this time.
A course of instruction for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performances or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or other students with musical background and interest.
Course description not available at this time.
Art of Listening I is an introductory study of music styles, media and forms as they exist in our culture from ancient times to the early 19th century through a survey of standard concert repertory and its historical development. Special emphasis is placed on aural identification. This course may require field trips.
Art of Listening II is an introductory study of music styles, media and forms as they exist in our culture from the early 19th century to the present through a survey of standard concert repertory and its historical development. Special emphasis is placed on aural identification. This course may require field trips.
Music Theory III is a study of chromatic harmony highlighting stylistic differences between 18th and 19th century practices. Original composition is encouraged. The course includes sight-singing, dictation, rhythmic drills, and the study of musical forms. Course includes 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab per semester. Prerequisite: MUS 104 or equivalent. Usually offered in fall semester.
(4 Credits)
Music Theory IV is a study of advanced chromatic harmony and 20th century compositional techniques. Original compositions are required. Includes sight-singing, dictation and keyboard exercises; rhythmic drills; and study of music forms. Course includes 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab per semester. Prerequisite: MUS 203 or equivalent. Usually offered in spring semester.
(1 Credit)
The chorus performs both sacred and secular works from the 16th century to the present. Vocal problems are given attention. Members are expected to participate in concerts, Broadway-type productions, television appearances, etc., as scheduled by the director. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
(1 Credit)
The chorus performs both sacred and secular works from the 16th century to the present. Vocal problems are given attention. Members are expected to participate in concerts, Broadway-type productions, television appearances, etc., as scheduled by the director. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
The A Cappella Singers perform unaccompanied vocal music from the Renaissance to the present. Students develop vocal techniques. Participation in concerts, community events, and other appearances, as scheduled, is required. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
The A Cappella Singers perform unaccompanied vocal music from the Renaissance to the present. Students develop vocal techniques. Participation in concerts, community events, and other appearances, as scheduled, is required. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
(1 Credit)
The band provides practice in basic musicianship, intonation and tone color. It is a study of various types and styles of music written or arranged for band. Students are prepared for public performances. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
(1 Credit)
The band provides practice in basic musicianship, intonation and tone color. It is a study of various types and styles of music written or arranged for band. Students are prepared for public performances. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
The HCC Jazz Ensemble performs instrumental jazz from the earliest to contemporary forms. Students develop instrumental techniques and participate in concerts, theater productions and other appearances, as scheduled. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
The HCC Jazz Ensemble performs instrumental jazz from the earliest to contemporary forms. Students develop instrumental techniques and participate in concerts, theater productions and other appearances, as scheduled. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
This course consists of the performance of percussion repertoire and the development of techniques on various percussion instruments. Participation in concerts, theater productions and other appearances, as scheduled, is required. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
This course consists of the performance of percussion repertoire and the development of techniques on various percussion instruments. Participation in concerts, theater productions and other appearances, as scheduled, is required. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
Students are able to create interesting electronic musical compositions through introductory studies of notation and sequencing software programs. Projects include computer-generated scores and compositions generated with MIDI, digital audio and digital synthesis. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab per semester. Course fee.
World Music has a broad scope within the realm of the music from other cultures, with the emphasis on music from cultures other than Western European. Students consider a variety of works from a variety of cultures across the globe by representative performers and composers. This course may require field trips.
"Second Shift" performs vocal jazz from the earliest to contemporary forms. Students develop vocal jazz techniques. Participation is required in concerts, theater productions and other appearances, as scheduled. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
"Second Shift" performs vocal jazz from the earliest to contemporary forms. Students develop vocal jazz techniques. Participation is required in concerts, theater productions and other appearances, as scheduled. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
(1 Credit)
The orchestra performs the great orchestral masterpieces as well as new orchestral literature. Students gain practice in basic musicianship, intonation, tone, color and sensitivity. Students are prepared for public performance. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
(1 Credit)
The orchestra performs the great orchestral masterpieces as well as new orchestral literature. Students gain practice in basic musicianship, intonation, tone, color and sensitivity. Students are prepared for public performance. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
The history of popular music in the United States is studied from the standpoint of cultural impact. This course includes the study of the origins of a "popular" audience, through the late 19th century; the development of Jazz, Ragtime, Blues, Tin-Pan-Alley, show music, Swing, motion picture music, Country, protest music, Rock and Roll, Folk and Rock. Students are required to participate in listening assignments representative of the various stages of the development of popular music. This course may require field trips.
Evolution of Jazz is a general introductory course exploring the history and development of jazz music in the United States over its century-long history and from its African and American precursors to its present-day practice throughout the world. The basic structural elements of music are introduced to provide a foundation for critical listening and discussion. This course may require field trips.
This course provides performance opportunities for students who wish to pursue a music program intended for performance, or other students with musical interest. Students collaboratively learn musical scenes and become comfortable with a professional rehearsal process, culminating in a public performance. The instructor provides feedback to aid students' development of complete dramatic material. Assigned scenes include selections from the classical, operatic, or musical theater repertoire. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
This course provides performance opportunities for students who wish to pursue a music program intended for performance, or other students with musical interest. Students collaboratively learn musical scenes and become comfortable with a professional rehearsal process, culminating in a public performance. The instructor provides feedback to aid students' development of complete dramatic material. Assigned scenes include selections from the classical, operatic, or musical theater repertoire. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and/or an audition. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
These courses provide instruction in voice or instrument for students who wish to pursue a music program on an individualized basis intended for solo performance, or for students who wish to transfer to a program leading to a degree in music, or for other students with musical background and interest. Students may choose either from the traditional repertoire or from a jazz/rock/show repertoire. One half-hour lesson and seven hours of practice per week. Course fee.
This course provides individualized instruction in vocal/ instrumental composition and arranging for students who wish to pursue a music degree, or for those with musical background and interest. One-half hour lesson and seven hours of work/practice per week. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Course fee.
This course provides individualized instruction in vocal/ instrumental composition and arranging for students who wish to pursue a music degree, or for those with musical background and interest. One-half hour lesson and seven hours of work/practice per week. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Course fee.
This course provides individualized instruction in vocal/ instrumental composition and arranging for students who wish to pursue a music degree, or for those with musical background and interest. One-half hour lesson and seven hours of work/practice per week. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Course fee.
This course provides individualized instruction in vocal/ instrumental composition and arranging for students who wish to pursue a music degree, or for those with musical background and interest. One-half hour lesson and seven hours of work/practice per week. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Course fee.
This course provides individualized instruction in vocal/ instrumental composition and arranging for students who wish to pursue a music degree, or for those with musical background and interest. One-half hour lesson and seven hours of work/practice per week. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Course fee.
This course provides individualized instruction in vocal/ instrumental composition and arranging for students who wish to pursue a music degree, or for those with musical background and interest. One-half hour lesson and seven hours of work/practice per week. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Course fee.
This course provides individualized instruction in vocal/ instrumental composition and arranging for students who wish to pursue a music degree, or for those with musical background and interest. One-half hour lesson and seven hours of work/practice per week. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Course fee.
This course provides individualized instruction in Jazz Theory and Vocal/Instrumental improvisation for students who wish to pursue a music degree, or for other students with musical background and interests. One-half hour lesson and seven hours of work per week. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Course fee.
This course is designed to develop specific theoretical skills to be realized on the keyboard. Subjects include all varieties of chords, figured bass realization, transposition, and scales. Total contact hours per week: 30 minutes individual lesson is scheduled weekly with the instructor per regular semester. An additional 7 hours of practice per week is expected. Course fee. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
This course is a continuation of MUS 179 and is designed to develop specific theoretical skills to be realized on the keyboard. Subjects include all varieties of chords, figured bass realization, transposition, choral score reading and scales. Total contact hours per week: 30 minutes individual lesson is scheduled biweekly with the instructor per regular semester. An additional 3 1/2 hours of practice per week is expected. Prerequisite: MUS 179. Course fee.
This course provides an ensemble experience by giving the guitar student an opportunity to perform in a group environment along with guitarists. Students are exposed to a variety of classical music literature, as well as styles and techniques associated with classical music, with an emphasis on guitar. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Course fee.
This course provides an ensemble experience by giving the guitar student an opportunity to perform in a group environment along with guitarists. Students are exposed to a variety of classical music literature, as well as styles and techniques associated with classical music, with an emphasis on guitar. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Course fee.
Students participating in this course have the opportunity to play a wide variety of classical music styles in a chamber setting, allowing for a high level of musical interaction within the ensemble. Students gain practice in basic musicianship, intonation, tone, color and sensitivity. Students develop instrumental techniques and participate in concerts, theater productions and other appearances as scheduled. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Course fee.
Students participating in this course have the opportunity to play a wide variety of classical music styles in a chamber setting, allowing for a high level of musical interaction within the ensemble. Students gain practice in basic musicianship, intonation, tone, color and sensitivity. Students develop instrumental techniques and participate in concerts, theater productions and other appearances as scheduled. Course includes 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of rehearsal per semester. Course fee.
NURS - Nursing
In this course, students utilize the nursing process to contribute to a plan of care to meet the assessed basic health and wellness needs of clients. Course includes 60 hours of lecture, 45 hours of laboratory, and 67.5 hours in a clinical setting per semester. Prerequisites: admission to the Nursing Program, current CPR Certification for Healthcare Providers, BIO 203, ENG 101 and PSY 101. Corequisites: BIO 204 & PSY 214. Course fee.
In this course, students utilize the nursing process to develop a plan of care to meet the assessed health and wellness needs of clients with commonly occurring health issues. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 105 hours in a clinical setting. Prerequisites: current CPR Certification for Healthcare Providers, NURS 101, BIO 204, PSY 214. BIO 205 is a prerequisite for NURS 210, NURS 220, and NURS 230. Course fee.
In this course, students utilize the nursing process to apply mental health concepts to clients with commonly occurring mental health issues. Course includes 30 lecture hours and 67.5 laboratory hours and is offered in the Spring and Fall semesters. Prerequisites: Current CPR Certification for Health Care Providers, NURS 101, BIO 204, PSY 214. Course fee.
Students use the nursing process to apply mental health concepts to clients with commonly occurring mental health issues and to plan care for clients with mental health disorders, with consideration for ethnic and cultural variations in beliefs, values, and health practices. Health promotion and maintenance are emphasized. Students begin to develop a foundation for practice through review of clinical literature and are challenged to reflect on their own behaviors and methods of communication. Course includes 30 lecture hours and 45 laboratory hours and is offered in the Spring and Fall semesters. Prerequisites: Current CPR Certification for Health Care Providers, NURS 101, BIO 204, PSY 214. Course fee.
In this course, students gain insight into the impact of contemporary issues on professional nursing practice. Students discover how current trends in nursing affect their personal practice as registered nurses and contribute to the overall health care of our nation. Course includes 15 hours of lecture. Prerequisites: Current CPR Certification for Healthcare Providers, NURS 101, PSY 214, BIO 204.
Course description not available at this time.
Course description not available at this time.
In this course, students utilize the nursing process to develop and/or adapt a plan of care to meet the assessed health and wellness needs of clientswith complex health care issues. Seven weeks. Course includes 37.5 hours of lecture and 90 hours in a clinical setting per 7-week term. Prerequisites: Current CPR Certification for Healthcare Providers, NURS 105, NURS 110, NURS 112, BIO 205. Course fee.
In this course, students utilize the nursing process to create and coordinate a plan of care for meeting the assessed health and wellness needs of clients with multiple and/or complex health care issues. Course includes 60 hours of lecture and 225 hours in a clinical setting per semester. Prerequisites: Current CPR Certification for Healthcare Providers, NURS 210, NURS 212, NURS 220, and NURS 221. Course fee.
In this course, students prepare to function in the role of a registered professional nurse. The concepts of leadership and management are presented with corresponding clinical applications in Medical-Surgical Nursing II (NURS 210). Course includes 15 hours of lecture. Prerequisites: NURS 105, NURS 110, and NURS 112.
Students utilize the nursing process to develop and/or adapt a plan of care to meet the assessed health and wellness needs of maternity and newborn clients. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 45 hours in a clinical setting and is offered in the Spring and Fall semesters. Prerequisites: current CPR Certification for Healthcare Providers, NURS 105, NURS 110, NURS 112, and BIO 205. Course fee.
(2.5 Credits)
Students utilize the nursing process to develop and/or adapt a plan of care to meet the assessed health and wellness needs of the pediatric patient and family. This course includes 22.5 hours of lecture and 45 hours in a clinical setting and is offered in the Spring and Fall semesters. Prerequisites: current CPR Certification for Healthcare Providers, NURS 105, NURS 108, NURS 112, and BIO 205. Course fee.
Students utilize the nursing process to develop and/or adapt a plan of care to meet the assessed health and wellness needs of the pediatric patient and family. This course includes 30 hours of lecture and 45 hours in a clinical setting and is offered in the Spring and Fall semesters. Prerequisites: current CPR Certification for Healthcare Providers, NURS 105, NURS 110, NURS 112 and BIO 205. Course fee.
OS - Office Systems
Keyboarding Basics teaches students to operate the computer keyboard by touch and begin development of acceptable speed and accuracy levels. Recommended for students who have not had formal keyboarding instruction or as a refresher for students returning to the work force in an office setting. Credit for prior learning is available. Course fee.
This course emphasizes the development of speed and accuracy with alphabetic, numeric and symbolic keyboarding and proofreading techniques. Assignments are customized to the individual student's skill level. Students use word processing software as a tool to prepare various business letters, memos, tables and reports. Decision-making skills are used to select document formats. Course projects emphasize the application of written communication skills and the ability to produce quality documents efficiently. Prerequisites: OS 100 or credit by assessment. Course fee.
This course introduces students to the fast-paced world of end-user communication technology and telecommunications. Students acquire knowledge of the fundamentals of electronic mail, voice processing, teleconferencing, wireless communication, and related technologies. The course includes student use of speech recognition software. Course fee.
This course provides students with opportunities to explore various office careers for development of short- and long-term career goals. Key topics include: written and oral business communication skills; international etiquette; records/financial management/office design, space and workplace safety; minute-taking; and an introduction to supervision. Hands-on practice in the use of various filing systems, event planning/travel arrangements as well as case studies and role-playing will provide students with experience in real-world business practices. Course fee.
Office administration in a medical setting requires human relations skills, confidentiality and computer software proficiency. The role and responsibilities of the medical office assistant are explored through simulations and application of office systems theory. Topics include the ethical and legal responsibilities of handling patient records, preparation of medical records, billing and insurance forms, professional reports, scheduling and communications. Course fee.
This course introduces basic bookkeeping concepts and procedures vital to developing and controlling business activities through the use of accounting software. Accounting for payables and receivables, preparing payroll activities and producing financial statements will be major topics of the course. Students will gain proficiency in developing sample databases designed to simulate real-world bookkeeping functions. Prerequisite: Qualifying score on the math assessment or MATH 021. Course fee.
This course focuses on the knowledge and skills common to all healthcare occupations. This course will explore content which includes healthcare delivery systems, communication skills, legal and ethical responsibilities, wellness and disease concepts, infection control, CPR, introductory first aid and safety, employability, computer skills, and professionalism common to health care occupations. Course fee.
This course emphasizes the continued development of speed and accuracy with keyboarding exercises. Assignments are customized to the individual student's skill level. Students use word processing software as a tool to prepare various business documents. Decision-making skills are used to select document formats. Course projects emphasize advanced word processing skills such as advanced tables, merged documents, tracking changes and macros. Prerequisite: OS 113. Course fee.
Students master transcription techniques and apply medical terminology and English language usage to prepare medical documents. Documents illustrate appropriate medical report forms, use of reference materials and computer software. Knowledge of software productivity techniques is essential for successful transcription. Prerequisites: AHS 101, ENG 012 or acceptable score on English assessment, and OS 113. Course fee.
This course provides a comprehensive overview of technology solutions for the organizational end user environment. Emphasis is on the development of business applications using several software packages, including desktop publishing and project management. Prerequisite: OS 116. Course fee.
Course description not available at this time.
Cooperative Education experiences are work-based learning experiences with an employer for a specific period of time. The experience may be paid and must be related to the career and specific curriculum in which the student is enrolled. It is an opportunity for the student to supplement/integrate classroom learning with learning from a related work setting. A student registers for one to four credits of Cooperative Education in the curriculum in which he/she is enrolled. Prerequisite: approval of program coordinator.
ORIE - Orientation
(0 Credit)
iCanSucceed is a half day empowerment program. Participants will hear from graduate and current students about how to navigate the academic and social demands of college. Keynote speaker: Dr. LaMarr Darnell Shields. Session will be held Friday, September 9, 2016 in Darlington Hall, Room 202.
For adult learners new to Harford Community College, this program will help you to become acquainted with life on campus and receive information that will prepare you for success at HCC. Registration is required. There will be optional sessions that address math anxiety and college technology. A light dinner will be served. Session will be held Thursday, August 25th in the Globe Café.
For students new to Harford Community College in January, this program will help you to become acquainted with life on campus and receive information that will prepare you for success at HCC. There will be sessions for adult learners and recent high school graduates. Registration is required. Course Notes: There will be optional sessions from noon to 1:30 pm that address math anxiety, college technology, and the African American student experience. Snow make-up date is January 28, 2017.
PL - Paralegal
This course introduces students to basic legal concepts, principles, and procedures. It is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the structure of the U.S. legal system including the role of the judicial, legislative, and executive branches; the history of law in the United States; the role of attorneys, law enforcement and other legal professionals; ethical and professional issues facing legal professionals; basic categories of law; litigation principles; and alternative dispute resolutions.
The constitutional aspects of arrest, search and seizure are considered, together with interrogation and confession, self-incrimination and right to counsel. Students learn rules of evidence as they apply to law enforcement officers in the performance of their investigatory duties and their testimony in court.
(3 Credits)
This course focuses on the theories, procedures, and resources used for solving legal problems through research. The student becomes familiar with the various legal publications found in a typical law library and learns to use those resources to develop and execute a plan for the solution of legal problems. Students explore electronic research programs. It is recommended that PL 101 be taken prior to or concurrently with Legal Research.
(3 Credits)
This course builds on the knowledge students have acquired in Legal Research. The skills developed in that course are applied to the tasks of case analysis and legal writing. Students are exposed to the methods of analyzing and briefing cases and statutes. The principles of technical legal writing are taught and applied in legal correspondence, instruments, office memoranda, pleadings, court memoranda, and appellate briefs. Prerequisites: ENG 101, PL 105, and PL 110.
This course provides an overview of the application of technology in the legal setting. Students learn the basics of computer hardware and software as well as purchase considerations. A major emphasis is placed on legal word processing and its applications in pleadings and correspondence. Telecommunications, computer assisted legal research, Internet, and other technology utilized in the law office are explored. Credit for prior learning is available. Students are required to take this course prior to PL 106.
The substantive law is discussed: how and why laws are created with emphasis on specific offenses against persons and property. Also covered: what constitutes a violation of the law and how police must satisfy the legal requirements imposed by the elements of the statutes so that the state may successfully prosecute a criminal case. Landmark U.S. Supreme Court and selected state court cases are studied.
This course covers the areas of unintentional and intentional torts, and torts based on strict liability. Topics include damages, defenses, and the application of insurance law. Emphasis is placed on the academic as well as the practical aspects of a tort practice. Prerequisite: PL 101.
This course focuses on both the procedural and substantive aspects of civil litigation. The student becomes familiar with Maryland and federal court procedure, structure, personnel, pleadings, discovery, and other topics. In addition, students study the issues of jurisdiction and evidence. Emphasis is placed on the typical litigation tasks that paralegals are assigned including drafting pleadings, investigation, preparing witnesses, and reviewing records. Prerequisite: PL 101.
This course focuses on the study of conflict in both interpersonal and professional contexts. Students examine the sources, symptoms, dynamics, and ramifications of conflict. In addition, the current methods of resolving conflict and disputes are closely examined. Students are given the opportunity to employ specific conflict resolution techniques that can be applied in legal, business, multicultural, and personal settings. Emphasis is placed on examining negotiation, mediation, and arbitration. It is recommended that PL 101 be taken prior to or concurrently with Conflict Analysis and Resolution.
This course focuses on the paralegal's duties in the area of bankruptcy and collection law. Students become familiar with procedural as well as substantive bankruptcy law. In addition, students learn about the law of debtor/creditor relations, collection of judgments, secured transactions, and electronic filing.
(3 Credits)
This course covers basic issues of the common law of contracts and the Uniform Commercial Code. Subjects covered include conditions precedent and subsequent, statute of frauds, offer, acceptance, consideration, breach, and remedies. The differences in these areas of law between the Uniform Commercial Code and the common law will be highlighted. Basic contract drafting will be learned and practiced. It is recommended that PL 101 be taken prior to or concurrently with this course.
This course covers the basic concepts of American government and civil rights and liberties as seen from the application of the Constitution of the United States. Landmark decisions regarding judicial review, separation of powers, and the freedoms guaranteed and protected by the Bill of Rights are discussed. Questions of balance of constitutional rights to privacy and national security are covered. Prerequisite: PL 101, PS 106, PS 101 or HIST 103.
(3 Credits)
This course focuses on a study of the Uniform Commercial Code as it applies to negotiable instruments and secured transactions. This course emphasizes agency, business organizations, and employment law. It examines creditors' rights, bankruptcy, property law (real and personal), and estates.
This course covers the areas of estate planning and probate procedure. The student becomes familiar with the ways an estate can be planned through the use of wills, trusts, and powers of attorney. Medical decisions are discussed through the use of the living will and medical power of attorney. Probate procedure is covered with an emphasis on Maryland procedure. Tax considerations of both estate planning and probate are considered. Prerequisite: PL 101.
This course covers the fundamentals of law office management and professional conduct. Subjects include basic principles and structure of management, employment opportunities for paralegals, timekeeping and accounting systems, marketing issues, administrative and substantive systems in the law office and law library, employee and client relations, law practice technology, and paralegal and attorney ethics.
This course covers issues related to the ownership of real property, real estate finance, and the landlord/tenant relationship. Emphasis is on the practical aspects of real estate and landlord/tenant practice, including settlement, title search, recordation, zoning, lease drafting, and lease enforcement. Prerequisite: PL 101.
This course covers the rights and responsibilities of parents, children, and spouses in the context of the family. Topics include the traditional areas of divorce, custody, support, and adoption. Newer areas such as pre-nuptial agreements, surrogacy, the legal rights of women, and divorce mediation are also considered. Litigation issues related to all topics will be addressed. Prerequisites: PL 101 and PL 124.
The student is introduced to the legal environment in which businesses operate. The course covers sources of law and the application of law to business. Areas examined include business crimes, contracts (under common law and the Uniform Commercial Code), sales torts (including product liability), administrative, antitrust, environmental, and consumer protection laws.
This course provides an overview of the functions and procedures of federal and state administrative law. Special focus is placed on using the Internet and legal research in various state and federal agencies. Topics include the Administrative Procedure Act, rulemaking, hearing procedure, state and federal applications, privacy issues, and the Freedom of Information Act. Prerequisite: PL 124.
The internship is designed to provide students with experiences typical of those encountered by paralegals in the work setting. Students work 135 hours as interns in law offices, governmental agencies, or the court system and spend 5 hours in the classroom. Prerequisites: PL 101, PL 105, PL 106, PL 124. Permission of the coordinator is required.
Cooperative Education experiences are work-based learning experiences with an employer for a specific period of time. The experience may be paid and must be related to the career and specific curriculum in which the student is enrolled. It is an opportunity for the student to supplement/integrate classroom learning with learning from a related work setting. A student registers for one to four credits of Cooperative Education in the curriculum in which he/she is enrolled. Prerequisites: PL 101, PL 105, PL 106, PL 124. Permission of the program coordinator is required.
PHIL - Philosophy
This course is a study of some of the major questions and issues arising in philosophy. Course content includes selected philosophers' views on the nature of knowledge, the existence of God, ethical values and the role of the State.
Students examine selected principles of formal and informal logic with the purpose of developing the ability to think critically, reason clearly and use language precisely. The course provides students with theoretical and practical reasoning skills needed to construct sound arguments and evaluate the arguments of others.
(3 Credits)
This introductory course in philosophical ethics encompasses the prominent ethical theories of Western philosophy and considers the application of ethics to modern cases and current situations. This course acquaints students with the major philosophical ethical thinkers in Western philosophy and their ethical theories. It gives students the philosophical perspectives and skills needed to recognize, understand, and apply these theories to contemporary issues in an intelligent and effective way by applying the theories to ethical cases.
(3 Credits)
The course covers pertinent ethical theories and applies them to cases drawn from several health care fields. Students gain philosophical understanding and ethical techniques necessary to identify and deal with such issues in theory and practice.
This course serves as an introduction to the philosophical study of ethics and the applied sub discipline of business ethics by covering pertinent ethical theories and applies them to cases drawn from the several business ethics fields. Students will gain philosophical understanding and ethical techniques necessary to identify and deal with such issues in theory and practice.
This course examines both the theory and practice of the relationship of humans to the non-human world. In addition, students explore environmental thinking with an historical context. Among issues discussed are population and consumption, food ethics, animal rights, and climate control.
This course addresses prominent questions generated by a philosophical study of religions. As such, the method is rational evaluation and fair-minded scrutiny of the issues. Issues include: the existence and nature of god, the afterlife, the soul, and pluralism. The course also examines insights and understandings proposed by some of the greatest thinkers in the discipline. The course is an objective academic study and is not faith-based.
PHOT - Photography
Black and White Photography I is an introductory course in traditional film-based photography, teaching 35mm camera operation and wet darkroom techniques. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab per semester. No previous photography experience is required. A 35mm film camera capable of manual exposure operation is required. Course fee.
Black and White Photography II is an advanced course in photographic techniques, styles and aesthetics. The refinement of camera exposure techniques, negative quality and print quality is emphasized. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab per semester. Prerequisite: PHOT 101 or permission of instructor. A 35mm film camera capable of manual exposure operation is required. Course fee.
The Darkroom Workshop is an individualized course in darkroom techniques. Students may experiment with a variety of films, papers and processes. The course concentrates on refining the photographic process with individualized supervision in the darkroom. Prerequisite: PHOT 101 or permission of instructor. Course fee. Usually offered in summer session.
Color Photography is an introduction to exposure with color film and color darkroom techniques. Emphasis is on learning and applying darkroom processes and procedures leading to production of high-quality color photographs. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab per semester. Prerequisite: PHOT 102. Course fee.
Photojournalism is an introduction to the uses of photography as a journalistic tool. A portfolio based on a semester-long project is required. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab per semester. Prerequisite: PHOT 101 or permission of instructor. Course fee.
Digital Photography I introduces students to the tools and processes of digital photography within a framework that emphasizes creative practice. Students learn fundamental skills necessary in the creation of digital photographic art, effective workflow management, and approaches to scanning and printing. Coursework includes lecture, studio work, and critique. This course is taught in the Mac lab studio using current software. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab per semester. Course fee.
Course description not available at this time.
Course description not available at this time.
This course concentrates on the use of alternative processes, analogue and digital, in the creation of photographic images. Emphasis is on the development of a personal, self-expressive style through the use of traditional and non-traditional materials, media, equipment, and presentation strategies. Students taking PHOT 202 cannot receive credit for this course and PHOT 201. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab per semester. Prerequisites: PHOT 101 and PHOT 102. Course fee.
This advanced course concentrates on the use of studio lighting procedures and equipment in the creation of portraiture and still life images in the studio and on location. Students taking PHOT 206 cannot receive credit for this course and PHOT 205 and/or PHOT 207. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab per semester. Prerequisites: PHOT 101 and PHOT 102. Course fee.
The History of Photography is a survey of the development of photography from its prehistory through today. The course includes the study of the interrelationships between photography and the other visual arts, the effects of changing technologies on the photographic image, and the contributions of major photographers and art movements, as well as historical perspectives. This course may require field trips.
Digital Photography II continues the development introduced in Digital Photography I. Students learn in-depth processes of image manipulation to create complex photographic imagery culminating in the production of a portfolio. Course work includes lecture, studio work and critique. This course is taught in the Mac lab studio using current software. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab per semester. Prerequisite: PHOT 131 or permission of instructor. Course fee.
PE - Physical Education
This course involves instruction of the fundamental skills of tennis. Students are required to physically practice basic tennis skills and drills. Rules of play, game scoring, and the health benefits of tennis are presented. No previous tennis experience is required.
This course involves instruction in intermediate skills of tennis. Students are required to physically practice these skills. Advanced game strategies, drills for improvement, individual analysis and technique correction are presented. Basic tennis skill proficiency is strongly advised.
This course involves instruction of beginner bowling skills. Students are required to physically practice fundamental bowling skills. The selection and care of bowling equipment, game scoring, and bowling etiquette are presented. No previous bowling experience is required. Course fee.
(1 Credit)
This course is an introduction to hiking techniques. Students are required to physically complete hikes at trail locations in Harford, Baltimore, and Cecil Counties. Map-reading skills, hike preparation considerations and the physical benefits of hiking are presented. Students must provide their own transportation to trail locations. While no previous hiking experience is required, the physical ability to complete moderately difficult terrains is strongly advised.
This course involves instruction of beginner badminton skills. Students are required to physically practice fundamental skills of badminton, including basic stroke orientation, strategy, rules, and scoring. No previous badminton experience is required.
(1 Credit)
Aqua yoga combines the benefits of traditional yoga and continuous water exercise. This course requires students to physically participate in pool exercise designed to improve muscular endurance and flexibility. Swimming skills are not required. Course fee.
Cross Training exercise employs two or more training methods in one workout session to develop cardiorespiratory and muscular endurance. This course requires students to physically participate in a group exercise program that uses a variety of equipment, including barbells, steps, rowers, jump ropes, and resistance bands. Course fee.
(1 Credit)
Indoor cycling is performed on specialized stationary bikes that simulate an outdoor riding experience. Students are required to physically participate in an indoor group cycling program that includes off- bike muscular endurance and flexibility exercises to enhance cycling performance. Course fee.
This course presents principles of cardiorespiratory endurance. Students are required to physically participate in a cardiorespiratory endurance program using stationary equipment, such as treadmills, cross trainers, and bikes. Course Fee.
Circuit training is a method of total body conditioning that involves movement from one exercise to another, using different pieces of equipment. Students are required to physically participate in a circuit training program designed to improve muscular endurance and cardiorespiratory endurance. Course fee.
(1 Credit)
This course presents principles and techniques of jogging. Students are required to physically participate in a jogging program. While no previous jogging experience is required, the physical ability to sustain high-impact cardiorespiratory exercise is strongly advised.
(1 Credit)
This course presents principles and techniques of mountain bike riding. Students are required to physically complete bike rides at trail locations in Harford, Baltimore, and Cecil Counties. The mechanical, physical, and safety aspects of trail riding are presented. Students must provide their own transportation to trail locations, a mountain bike and a helmet. An understanding of basic mountain biking skills is strongly advised. Students should be physically able to bike moderately difficult terrain. Course fee.
(1 Credit)
Aikido is a form of self-defense that uses the principles of nonresistance in order to debilitate the strength of the opponent. Students are required to participate in paired partner practice to learn movements that respond to a given attack with a specific defense. No previous Aikido experience is required.
(1 Credit)
Karate is a form of self-defense that uses the hands and feet to deliver and block blows. Students are required to physically practice basic self-defense skills, flexibility exercises, and mental focus techniques. No previous Karate experience is required.
(1 Credit)
Yoga promotes spiritual health and physical fitness. This course requires physical participation in a yoga exercise program designed to improve muscular endurance and flexibility, breath control, and mental concentration. No previous yoga experience is required.
(1 Credit)
Pilates involves a series of controlled movements designed to improve core muscle stability and strength. This course requires physical participation in a Pilates mat exercise program. No previous Pilates experience is required.
(1 Credit)
This course presents principles and techniques of aqua exercise designed to improve physical fitness. Students are required to physically participate in group water exercise that uses a variety of resources, including kickboards and swim bars. Swimming skills are not required. Course fee.
(1 Credit)
Aqua run is an exercise program that includes continuous deep water movement to develop cardiorespiratory and muscular endurance. Students are required to physically participate in water exercise. While swimming skills are not required, students should feel comfortable exercising in deep water. Flotation devices that assist deep water running are provided. Course fee.
(1 Credit)
This course presents creative dance techniques, improvisation, and choreography. Students are required to physically practice dance movement skills, including jazz, ballet, and modern dance. No previous dance training is required.
This course provides an overview of the concepts of wellness and physical fitness. Topics include fitness, nutrition, stress management, holistic health, and chronic health issues.
(1 Credit)
This course presents principles of weight training, with an emphasis on proper form and technique. Students are required to physically participate in a weight training program designed to increase muscular strength or muscular endurance. No previous weight lifting experience is required. Course fee.
This course presents principles of advanced weight training, with an emphasis on proper form and technique. Students are required to physically participate in a weight training program designed to increase muscular strength or muscular endurance. Previous weight lifting experience is strongly advised. Course Fee.
(1 Credit)
This course presents principles and techniques of a walking program. Students are required to physically participate in a walking program designed to improve cardiorespiratory endurance.
Course description not available at this time.
SCI - Physical Science
Physical Science I is a development of physical science for nonscience majors. Insight into the methods of scientific investigation is stressed. Topics include motion and force, energy and energy transfer, properties of matter, heat, electricity, magnetism, and light. Emphasis is on building process skills and content understanding using a "hands on" inquiry based teaching methodology. Insight into the structure, the beauty and the power of the physical sciences is stressed throughout the course. Course meets AAT (Associate of Arts in Teaching) degree requirements.
An introductory laboratory course in the basic techniques of measurements and analysis of the motion of bodies, heat properties of bodies and the characteristics of waves. Usually offered in fall semester. Prerequisite or co-requisite: SCI 105. SCI 105 may also be taken concurrently. The course meets for a total of 30 laboratory hours per semester. Course fee.
Physical Science II is a development of physical science for nonscience majors. Insight into the methods of scientific investigation is stressed with emphasis on the electromagnetic spectrum, nuclear phenomena, the nature of solid matter, and the impact of science, computer and technology on twenty-first century humans. Forces in matter, moving charges, atomic models, crystal structure, chemical reactions and environmental consequences are studied. Usually offered in spring semester.
This is an introductory laboratory course in the basic techniques of measurements and analysis of the electrical properties of bodies and the properties of atoms. Usually offered in spring semester. The course meets for a total of 30 laboratory hours per semester. Prerequisite or co-requisite: SCI 107. Course fee.
This course introduces students to the essential principles and fundamental concepts of energy necessary to build an energy literate society. Topics include the history of energy use, energy science and mechanics, electricity, sources of energy and use of energy, energy conservation and efficiency, environmental impacts, health effects, economics, policy, and future technology. Field experiences may be required; a reasonable alternative to the field trips will be available. Pre-requisite: Test into college level reading or successfully complete ENG 003; MATH 023 or MATH 024. This course meets for a total of 45 lecture hours. Course fee.
(3 Credits)
This couses is designed to serve as science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) professional development for in-service K-12 teachers. Discipline-specific tracks (such as engineering, biology/chemistry, earth/environmental science) will focus on active learning of currently relevant topics and the development of best teaching and learning practices in STEM.
PHYS - Physics
This course is for students requiring noncalculus based physics. It is a presentation of the fundamentals of physics emphasizing mechanics, heat and wave motion. Physics is treated as a living, expanding adventure that can turn you on to a more perceptive view of physical reality. Insight into the structure, the beauty and the importance of physics is achieved by study and discussion of the central ideas and principles of physics and their relation to the everyday environment. Course meets for 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of laboratory and 15 hours of discussion per semester. Prerequisite: MATH 109 or equivalent (may be taken concurrently). Usually offered in fall semester.
This course is for students requiring noncalculus based physics, presenting fundamentals of physics including electromagnetism, relativity, structure of matter, atomic and nuclear physics. Course meets for 45 hours of lecture, 30 hours of laboratory and 15 hours of discussion per semester. Prerequisite: PHYS 101. Usually offered in spring semester.
This is an introductory laboratory course designed to accompany General Physics I (Physics 203) that explores basic physical concepts in vectors, laws of motion, force and energy; and principles of mechanics, collisions, linear and angular momentum, rotation and gravitation. Course meets for 45 hours per semester. Pre or co-requisite: PHYS 203
This course is the first semester of a calculus-based general physics course sequence. Laws of motion, force and energy; and principles of mechanics, collisions, linear momentum, rotation and gravitation are studied and used for problem solving. Course meets for 45 hours of lecture and 15 hours of discussion/problem solving per semester. Prerequisite: MATH 203. Usually offered in spring semester.
This second semester of a calculus-based general physics course sequence covers vibrations, waves and fluids; heat, kinetic theory and thermodynamics; electrostatics, circuits and magnetism. Course meets for 45 hours of lecture, 45 hours of laboratory, and 15 hours of discussion/problem solving per semester.Prerequisites: PHYS 203 and MATH 204. Usually offered in fall semester.
This third semester of a calculus-based general physics sequence covers electrodynamics, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves, geometrical optics, interference and diffraction, special theory of relativity, and modern physics. Course meets for 45 hours of lecture, 45 hours of laboratory, and 15 hours of discussion/problem solving per semester. Prerequisite: PHYS 204. Usually offered in spring semester.
PS - Political Science
Students participate in an analysis of American national politics. Topics include the Constitution, political parties, interest groups, Congress, the Presidency, the Judiciary and recent public policies. Special consideration is given to the individual's relationship with the national government and to the factors influencing decision-making in the national government.
Students participate in analysis of state and local government, politics and policies. Topics include theory, intergovernmental regulations, state constitutions, political parties, interest groups, legislatures, executives, courts, subdivision governments, metropolitan politics and current issues. An effort is made to understand variables and pressures involved in state and local governmental decision-making, especially in Maryland and Harford County. Usually offered in the evening.
This course introduces students to basic legal concepts, principles, and procedures. It is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the structure of the U.S. legal system including the role of the judicial, legislative, and executive branches; the history of law in the United States; the role of attorneys, law enforcement and other legal professionals; ethical and professional issues facing legal professionals; basic categories of law; litigation principles; and alternative dispute resolutions.
This course has two major goals. One goal is to survey contemporary international issues so that students have a comprehensive understanding of issues in the Middle East, China, Russia, Africa and other areas of current interest. A second goal is to introduce students to the methods and objectives of foreign policy-making, the theory of the balance of power, the principles of international law and organization, and the development of regional integration such as in Europe. 3 credits. Corequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101
This course introduces students to the comparative study of politics and governments. Following an overview of political systems, the instructor selects representative countries from both the developed and developing worlds and highlights issues including political culture, participation, government structures, and public policies in each. Using case studies, students engage in comparative political analysis of both historical processes and current issues facing countries domestically and internationally. 3 credits. Corequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101
Students participate in analyses of urban government and politics. The course examines the evolution of urban/metropolitan development, theory, and structure in the United States; identifies the key actors and addresses their roles both within the city and as liaisons with local, state and federal governments; and addresses the most pressing issues currently facing these jurisdictions, including: economic development, suburbanization, city infrastructure and finance, race relations and immigration, poverty, housing, law enforcement, and education. Prerequisite: ENG 012, ENG 018, or score on ACCUPLACER ACE qualifying student to take ENG 101.
This course will enable students to increase their understanding of contemporary issues in international relations in a global context. It places emphasis on gaining critical perspectives on contemporary theory and practice--the goal is to develop the student's ability to evaluate and explain contemporary issues from historical and theoretical perspectives in the disciplines of international relations. After a review of how nation-states interact in the international arean, we will travel to Europe and focus primarily on the two types of non-state actors (intergovernmental and nongovernmental) and the roles they play. We will visit and be briefed by representatives at the United Nations in New York, the European Union headquarters in Brussels, the International Court of Justice in The Hague and the Bretton Woods Project in London. This course is designed to address issues such as regionalization, globablization, international conflict, the future of democracy and others in an interdisciplinary way and provide a solid grounding in research methods in the social sciences. Students will gain a deep understanding of how international organizations affect the practice of world politics because they will experience it for themselves. A course fee of approximately $2500 covers all travel expenses. Pre-requisite: Instructor permission.
Students work as interns in governmental agencies, in elected officials' offices or on political campaigns. The purpose of the internship includes providing students with practical experiences in politics and government, and giving to students the opportunity to determine if they desire a career in government. A wide variety of field placements exists. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Students work as interns in governmental agencies, in elected officials' offices or on political campaigns. The purpose of the internship includes providing students with practical experiences in politics and government, and giving to students the opportunity to determine if they desire a career in government. A wide variety of field placements exists. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Students work as interns in governmental agencies, in elected officials' offices or on political campaigns. The purpose of the internship includes providing students with practical experiences in politics and government, and giving to students the opportunity to determine if they desire a career in government. A wide variety of field placements exists. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Students work as interns in governmental agencies, in elected officials' offices or on political campaigns. The purpose of the internship includes providing students with practical experiences in politics and government, and giving to students the opportunity to determine if they desire a career in government. A wide variety of field placements exists. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Students work as interns in governmental agencies, in elected officials' offices or on political campaigns. The purpose of the internship includes providing students with practical experiences in politics and government, and giving to students the opportunity to determine if they desire a career in government. A wide variety of field placements exists. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Students work as interns in governmental agencies, in elected officials' offices or on political campaigns. The purpose of the internship includes providing students with practical experiences in politics and government, and giving to students the opportunity to determine if they desire a career in government. A wide variety of field placements exists. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
PN - Practical Nursing
Students use the nursing process, within the scope of practical nursing, to identify physiological and psychological stresses interfering with the well-being of the childbearing woman, the newborn infant, and children. The emphasis of this course is on providing basic nursing care to assist the client to adapt to or eliminate stresses which interfere with maternal and child health. Five weeks; summer term only. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 70 hours in a clinical setting per 5-week summer term. Prerequisites: NURS 105, NURS 107, NURS 112. Current CPR Certification for Healthcare Providers. Corequisites: PN 121, PN 122. Course fee.
Within the scope of practical nursing, students use the nursing process in a structured setting to provide nursing care for clients who are experiencing acute or chronic physiological stressors throughout the life span and help promote physiological and psychological well-being. Ten weeks; summer term only. Course includes 50 hours of lecture and 70 hours in a clinical setting per 10-week summer term. Prerequisites: NURS 105, NURS 107, NURS 112, Current CPR Certification for Healthcare Providers. Corequisite: PN 118 and PN 122. Course fee.
This course provides students with information about issues and trends that influence their careers in practical nursing. Content includes the development of nursing, legal and ethical issues affecting nursing, and career opportunities and challenges. Five weeks; summer term only. Course includes 5 hours of lecture per 5-week summer term. Prerequisite: NURS 105, NURS 107, NURS 112. Corequisites: PN 118 and PN 121.
PSY - Psychology
A broad spectrum of research and theoretical concepts are presented to provide a balanced understanding of human behavior. Topics include the biological basis of behavior, human development, personality, health and wellness, learning and memory, social diversity, abnormal behavior and therapy. Prerequisites: a qualifying score on the English assessment or ENG 012 or ENG 018 or ENG 101.
(3 Credits)
This course is a learning experience designed to provide students with skills necessary to develop a sensitivity to others, to become more effective listeners, and to convey awareness, understanding and patience. Students may become more effective in dealing with many different kinds of people in groups, organizations and in the community. This course is especially recommended for persons in business, technical and service career fields that require an effective skill level in interpersonal relations and communications.
This course studies the developing person from conception through late childhood. Current research and applications are used to explain biosocial, psychosocial and cognitive development. The importance of specific environmental contexts in development is emphasized. Topics include bonding and attachment, language development, abuse and neglect, parenting, gender role development, mental retardation and giftedness, peer relationships, and moral development. Prerequisite: PSY 101.
This course presents the study of abnormal behavior including anxiety, mood disorders, schizophrenia, substance abuse disorder, and other DSM categories. Topics include diagnosis, classification, causes, prevention and treatment modalities with emphasis on eclectic, biological, and cognitive models, as well as cultural influences, community needs and resources. Prerequisite: PSY 101.
This course is a survey of the socialization, gender role development, mental health, special concerns and life span changes of women. The relationship of psychology to the position and roles of women is also examined from a cross-cultural perspective. Usually offered in spring semester.
Educational Psychology focuses on the learning process and related ideas such as development, individual differences, cognition, effective learning environments, motivation and exceptionalities. Emphasis is placed on studying the development of effective teaching-learning relationships in the American school environment. Connections among a variety of disciplines are stressed, as well as links to the real world beyond the classroom. Prerequisite: PSY 101.
This course studies the physiological and psychological effects of alcohol and depressants, psychoactive drugs, stimulants and hallucinogens on the user and abuser. Topics include the effects of drugs taken in combination, drug classification, absorption, distribution, metabolism, half-life, tolerance, cross-tolerance and elimination. Prerequisite: PSY 101. Usually offered in spring semester.
This course incorporates psychological and sociological theory and research as applied to contemporary group situations. A wide range of issues concerning human experience in group settings is explored, including interpersonal attraction, gender roles and sexism, cross-cultural and within cultural differences, attitude formation based on group membership, prejudice, conflict, power and aggression between groups, pro-social behavior and group conformity. Prerequisite: PSY 101.
Using the contributions from researchers in psychology, sociology and other behavioral sciences, this course seeks to explain and understand behavior in the workplace. A broad range of issues is explored, including organizational behavior, motivation, learning, attitudes and job satisfaction, socialization, power, stress and group structures and effectiveness. The course is designed for behavioral science majors, and those in the workplace who want to update their management, supervisory or interpersonal skills. Usually offered in spring semester.
This is an introductory counseling skills course that emphasizes developing skills and techniques to facilitate the helping process, through an understanding of helping theory and the dynamics of the helping relationship. Helper self development will be achieved via in-class exercises and the use of a pseudo-client. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or permission of instructor. Usually offered in fall semester.
This course studies the developing person across the life span from conception to death. Numerous theoretical perspectives are applied to studying biological, cognitive, psychosocial change. Emphasis is given to the role of genetic influences as well as the specific environmental contexts in which development occurs. Prerequisite: PSY 101.
This course presents the period of adolescence as a distinct stage in the lifespan, with its own unique biological, psychosocial, and cognitive issues. Current theoretical perspectives and research findings are used to explain and explore such topics as the challenges of puberty, identity development, risk taking behavior, intimate relationships, and the impact of cultural variables on adolescent development. Prerequisite: PSY 101. Usually offered in the Spring semester.
Special Topics: Survey of Biopsychology Biopsychology is a rapidly growing branch of psychology that studies the relationship between the structure and functioning of the nervous system and behavior. This course will introduce students to the biological bases of behavior by exploring research findings of biopsychologists in explaining such behaviors as wakefulness and sleep, learning and memory, emotions and stress, psychological disorders such as schizophrenia and depression, and reproductive functioning. New information in this field is rapidly increasing; as students examine the current level of knowledge in this field and develop a framework of biopsychological principles, they will become prepared to incorporate the future knowledge that is sure to follow.
Cooperative Education experiences are work-based learning experiences with an employer for a specific period of time. The experience may be paid and must be related to the career and specific curriculum in which the student is enrolled. It is an opportunity for the student to supplement/integrate classroom learning with learning from a related work setting. A student registers for one to four credits of Cooperative Education in the curriculum in which he/she is enrolled. Prerequisite: approval of program coordinator.
Cooperative Education experiences are work-based learning experiences with an employer for a specific period of time. The experiences may be paid and must be related to the career and specific curriculum in which the student is enrolled. It is an opportunity for the student to supplement/integrate classroom learning with learning from a related work setting. A student registers for one to four credits of Cooperative Education in the curriculum in which he/she is enrolled. Prerequisite: approval of program coordinator.
RELG - Religion
This course is a survey and analysis of the literature and religion of the Old Testament within the context of the ancient Near East. The course is an objective academic study and is not faith-based.
This course is a survey and academic analysis of The New Testament, related early Christian literature, and the historical, archaeological, and cultural contexts that influenced these documents. The course is an objective academic study and is not faith-based.
This course is a comparative overview of the most prominent living religions. Each religion is approached from the view of the religion's history, culture, beliefs, rituals, and theologies.
SOC - Sociology
This course is the scientific study of society. Detailed consideration is given to culture, social control and deviation, social groups, social instruction, social stratification, ethnic minorities, demography, the community, social change and collective behavior.
This course places major emphasis on a variety of contemporary American and world social and cultural issues -- ranging from social justice issues and diversity (gender, race, and social class) to criminal justice issues and violence to global concerns such as the ecological system, war, and terrorism. Analysis of multiple causation and past historical origins are connected to contemporary problems.
The study of social work as a professional endeavor is the focus of this class. Students explore the scope of social welfare in connection with social change, social control and the relationship between services and clients. This course is of value to sociology and psychology majors who intend to work as mental health aides or in other allied areas. Prerequisite: SOC 101, PSY 101 recommended.
This course provides analysis of the social institution of the family through theory and research in the field. Emphasis is placed on the social organization of the family in its structure and its function, including detailed consideration of historical cultural factors, social class elements, premarital matters, marriage adjustment and the family life cycle.
This course provides a sociological study of the causes of crime and the relationships between criminal behavior and various social factors such as age, sex, race, religion, socioeconomic status, etc. Included also are studies of crime rates, white-collar crime and victimless crimes. Prerequisite: SOC 101.
The student is introduced to the nature and extent of juvenile delinquency. Emphasis is placed on the causative factors involved and methods of control and prevention. Special attention is given to the relationship between delinquency and the social structure.
This course will examine the nature and interrelationships of race, class, and gender in American Society. By using a sociological framework for understanding race, class, and gender and how they intersect with each other and in social structures, we will analyze and interpret contemporary social problems. In addition, we will use this framework to examine the racial, class, and gender dimensions of the Civil Rights Movement and its impact on contemporary social issues.
Cooperative Education experiences are work-based learning experiences with an employer for a specific period of time. The experience may be paid and must be related to the career and specific curriculum in which the student is enrolled. It is an opportunity for the student to supplement/integrate classroom learning with learning from a related work setting. A student registers for one to four credits of Cooperative Education in the curriculum in which he/she is enrolled. Prerequisite:approval of program coordinator.
SPAN - Spanish
This course develops communicative proficiency in Spanish at the elementary level. Students also gain insights into Spanish-speaking cultures. It is primarily designed for students who have never studied Spanish. No prerequisite. Usually offered in fall semester.
This course continues to develop communicative proficiency in Spanish at the elementary level. Students also explore aspects of the Spanish culture. Prerequisite: SPAN 101 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Usually offered in spring semester.
This course continues to develop language skills in Spanish at an advanced level. Cultural materials are also integrated into course content and activities. Prerequisite: SPAN 102 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Usually offered in fall semester.
This course emphasizes the continued refinement and development of language skills in Spanish at an advanced level. Students also discuss cultural materials. Prerequisite: SPAN 201 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Usually offered in spring semester.
This course is a study of Spanish culture, civilization and literature from the Middle Ages to the 1800s. All work is in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Usually offered in fall semester.
This course is a study of Spanish culture, civilization and literature from 1800 to the present. All work is in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Usually offered in spring semester.
This course develops oral proficiency of students who are in need of applying their grammatical knowledge to real life situation discourse. Grammatical concepts from elementary and intermediate classes are practiced and expanded for more extensive dialogue. Subject matter stems from themes relative to language, cultural, global, and political issues. Students apply their speaking skills by engaging in conversations, panel discussions, short presentations, interviews, and group work. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Usually offered in fall semester.
SDEV - Student Development
This course is designed to help students identify and develop their career/life and academic goals. Students will clarify their interests and skills while developing effective academic and personal goal-setting techniques. This course also focuses on setting and achieving short-term academic goals, preparing for success in college through effective study skill techniques, and learning to accept responsibility for one's behavior. May not be used to meet graduation requirements.
This course is designed to assist each student to become more aware of the processes of career and life planning and their relationship to interests, values, abilities and goals. It prepares the student to establish, change or confirm career goals through investigation and integration of the theory of the developmental process of career decision-making, self-analysis and a survey of career information. Course fee.
This course is designed to help students develop and refine skills necessary for success in college and in life. While encouraging students to take responsibility for their behavior, it provides practice in a variety of strategies that can lead students to greater academic, professional, and personal success. Students examine study skill strategies, creative and critical thinking, and personal self-management. In addition, students are encouraged to explore and change self-defeating behaviors which may diminish their ability to succeed. Permission of instructor required. Course fee.
This course provides individualized assistance to students in developing skills, competencies, and knowledge essential to career exploration and decision making. Students fulfill a learning contract based on needs for self-assessment and occupational research. Minimum of five hours with instructor and twenty hours of lab and research assignments. Permission of instructor required. Course fee.
This course provides assistance to students in developing skills, competencies and knowledge essential in securing employment. Students learn the use of technology in job searching, the writing of effective resumes and cover letters and necessary interviewing skills. Permission of instructor required.
THEA - Theatre
This course introduces students to the basic elements of theatrical performance and the components that make up theatre production, including understanding the roles of the actor, director, playwright, and designer. Students explore the varied methods of presentation, concepts, vocabulary, and the range of techniques and experiences involved in a production. Attendance at and critical evaluation of theatrical performances and participation on a performance crew may be required.
(3 Credits)
This course introduces students to basic acting skills, including exercises in characterization, relaxation and concentration, verbal and nonverbal communication, and expression. Students are required to attend or participate in productions. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester. This course may require field trips.
(3 Credits)
This course includes the study of textural analysis, scene study, and the process of developing characterization in different historical styles of performance. Students are required to attend or participate in productions. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester. This course may require field trips. Prerequisite: THEA 102.
(3 Credits)
This course is a practical study of basic technical production with emphasis in scenic construction and lighting techniques. Topics include scenic design, construction, rigging, painting, and the handling of lighting instruments. This course consists of lecture as well as shop hours. Students are required to participate as technical crew in departmental productions. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester. Course fee.
(3 Credits)
This course continues the study of technical production needs of any theatrical production with an evaluation of the theatre production and an emphasis on the supervision of running crews for preparation and performance. This course consists of lecture as well as shop hours. Students are required to participate as technical crew in departmental productions. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester. Prerequisite: THEA 104. Course fee.
This course focuses on the analysis of dramatic texts as plans for public performance. Students practice reading, researching, and planning productions based on a variety of important international plays. Attendance at and critical evaluations of performances and participation in performance projects are required. Course fee.
Course description not available at this time.
Course description not available at this time.
This course introduces students to the basic techniques, principles, and genres of directing a theatrical production. Topics include the director's role, composition, script analysis, movement and rhythm, production preparation, and procedures. At the conclusion of the course, the student prepares a production for performance. Additional time outside of class for rehearsals is required. Prerequisites: THEA 101 and THEA 104.
(3 Credits)
This course introduces theater forms and spaces through the various design elements and locales of a scenic environment. Students study the principles and techniques of scenic design as it pertains predominately to the stage, as well as television and film. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester. This course may require field trips. Prerequisites: THEA 104. Course fee.
(3 Credits)
This course introduces the basic principles of costume design and construction. Students explore costume patterning, construction methods, draping, sewing technique, equipment usage, and skills necessary to the entire costuming process. Students are expected to serve on a costume crew for one production during the semester. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester. Prerequisites: THEA 101 and THEA 279. Course fee.
(3 Credits)
This course continues the study of technical production needs of any theatrical production with an evaluation of the theatre production and an emphasis on the supervision of running crews for preparation and performance. This course consists of lecture as well as shop hours. Students are required to participate as technical crew in departmental productions. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester. Prerequisite: THEA 104. Course fee.
This course includes the study of voice production with extensive exercises in developing a wide range of controls in pitch, volume, diction, and quality to meet the standards of acting and media. Through a highly technical phonetic approach, students learn how to reduce their own and produce other American speech regionalisms and cultural accents. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester. Prerequisites: THEA 102. Course fee.
This course introduces physical techniques that help develop a movement vocabulary for the actor. Starting with an examination of the body, the student applies the basic movement vocabulary and terminology of ballet, modern and jazz styles, mime, neutral mask, physical comedy (falls, lifts, timing, partnering), and scripted scenes with a strong physical component. This course may require field trips. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester. Prerequisites: THEA 101 and THEA 102.
This course is a studio course in which students develop an understanding of the art of traditional makeup application predominately for the stage as well as for television and film. Through the use of cosmetics and prosthetics, students learn to execute corrective, character, and age makeup. Students are expected to serve on a makeup crew for one production during the semester. Course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of studio per semester. Prerequisites: THEA 101 and THEA 279. Course fee.
The Cooperative Education Program provides students with a planned and supervised learning environment allowing them to apply classroom learning to the world of work. The program enables students to become better acquainted with both theory and practice in their chosen career field. 37.5 hours per credit (112 hours per 3 credit course). Prerequisites: 12 completed hours in Theatre and permission of instructor.
This course is a practical application of classroom theory and technique demonstrated through crew and/or cast participation in a specific theatrical production to be presented on campus. Students elect or are assigned a task and work as a crew or cast member. Acting and/or dancing in a production is by audition only. Credit is awarded upon satisfactory completion of the task or role. Students are required to participate in productions. Prerequisite: THEA 104.
This course is a practical application of classroom theory and technique demonstrated through crew and/or cast participation in a specific theatrical production to be presented on campus. Students elect or are assigned a task and work as a crew or cast member. Acting and/or dancing in a production is by audition only. Credit is awarded upon satisfactory completion of the task or role. Students are required to participate in productions. Prerequisite: THEA 104.
This course is a practical application of classroom theory and technique demonstrated through crew and/or cast participation in a specific theatrical production to be presented on campus. Students elect or are assigned a task and work as a crew or cast member. Acting and/or dancing in a production is by audition only. Credit is awarded upon satisfactory completion of the task or role. Students are required to participate in productions. Prerequisite: THEA 104.
VPA - Visual and Performing Arts
This course introduces students to the areas of visual arts, dance, music and theater through an exploration of representative works. This experience enhances self-expression and provides a better understanding of the human experience. This course may require field trips.

  Harford Community College - Credit Catalog for 2016-2017
  http://ww2.harford.edu/Catalog/course_descriptions.asp

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